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Local News

  • Options available to help those affected by tornadoes

    Anyone looking for a way to help those affected by last week’s tornadoes in Kentucky and Indiana have a few options when it comes to donating time, items and money.

    Monetary donations are the best way to help locally, said Sharon Thompson, director of the American Red Cross in Elizabethtown. Thompson said this allows the Red Cross to give families cards they can use to purchase needed items.

  • E’town woman in stable condition after domestic dispute

    An Elizabethtown woman involved in a Sunday morning domestic dispute that culminated in an attempted stabbing was upgraded Monday afternoon to stable condition from serious.

    Elizabethtown police responded at 3:43 a.m. Sunday to the 200 block of Kimball Drive where they found Maila G. Kennedy, 42, bleeding from the neck, according to a news release from the Elizabethtown Police Department.

  • HMH to expand hospital art exhibit

    Elizabethtown resident Wendy Coverson recognized the photography contest at Hardin Memorial Health was a way for her to get her work and name out to a larger audience.

    Now her panorama — capturing the amber essence and rippling splendor of Cumberland Falls in autumn – is splashed on the walls of Hardin Memorial Hospital adjacent to the gift shop.

  • ECTC to host ‘That Takes Ovaries’

    The ovarian fortitude of local women will be celebrated at an international event coming to Hardin County this week.

    Elizabethtown Community and Technical College is hosting an event called That Takes Ovaries, spawned from an international movement started in 2002. The event, which celebrates gutsy actions taken by girls and women, is at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, which is International Women’s Day. The event is in room 212 of the Regional Postsecondary Center on campus.

  • Photo: Didn’t mean to ruffle any feathers
  • White, Kolley plead not guilty to new charges

    Abdullah R. White and Samantha J. Kolley entered pleas of not guilty to new charges related to the death of Kristie L. Allen during an arraignment Monday in LaRue Circuit Court.

    White, 35, of Radcliff, is accused of killing Allen, who was found dead Dec. 30 inside a Buffalo home she was housesitting for friends. Last month the LaRue County coroner ruled Allen’s cause of death asphyxia, declaring it a homicide.

  • Knox hiring, training sessions planned

    As part of the Department of Defense hiring reform initiative, all DoD components will transition to web-based software owned by the Office of Personnel Management to fill internal and external vacancies,

    During fiscal year 2011-12, the Department of the Army is deploying an automated system called USA Staffing.

    The vision of the Army Civilian Resource community is to provide a single point of entry for all recruitment and hiring activities. Briefings and training sessions are as follows at Haszard Auditorium, Gaffey Hall:

  • Goal in striking distance for Bowl for Kids’ Sake

    Big Brothers Big Sisters officials think they might reach their $85,000 goal for Bowl for Kids’ Sake.

    They hadn’t totaled pledges Sunday during the last official bowl of the campaign in Hardin County, when the crash of pins throughout Dix-E-Town Lanes on North Dixie Avenue was followed by excited cheers.

    Cathy Galante, chief development officer for Big Brothers Big Sisters in Kentucky, said there seemed to be slightly more participants this year than last year, which bodes well for donation totals.

  • Photo: Dropping in for lunch
  • Elizabethtown graduate helps NATO handle IEDs

    Derek Smith grew up listening to his father talk about how important it was to give back to his country and the people around him.

    “He always thought it was important to give back to your nation,” he said.

    Smith’s father did not talk much about serving in Europe during World War II, but the lessons both his parents imparted about giving back to support something greater than himself stuck with him.

    He expected to serve in the U.S. Army for a couple years to give back. He enjoyed the work, which has turned into a 26-year-long career.