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Local News

  • Central Hardin reaches Bands of America semifinals

    Central Hardin High School’s marching band this past weekend earned a place in the semifinals of the Bands of America competition for the first time in the band’s history.

    The band placed 26th place overall out of 92 bands from across the nation that competed Thursday and Friday. The top 30 bands from that competition were accepted into the semifinals at Lucas Oil Stadium, home of the Indianapolis Colts.

  • String of E'town businesses broken into over weekend

    A string of Elizabethtown businesses on the 2400 block of Ring Road and Towne Drive were broken into over the weekend.

    Elizabethtown Police Department report various tools were used to break into the locked businesses. In some cases, the neighboring business was entered before entry was forced through an interior wall.

    No video footage was recovered from the businesses, said Virgil Willoughby, EPD public information officer. Police are continuing to investigate.

  • St. Christopher seeks community's help for Thanksgiving meal

    St. Christopher Church in Radcliff is asking for the community’s help in delivering Thanksgiving meals to Hardin County families who cannot provide one for themselves.

    Parish administrator Dean Sears said the church has been sponsoring the Thanksgiving meal with the help of other area churches for more than 10 years. The event is conducted through Hardin County Helping Hand of Hope.

    Community members donate cooked turkeys and pies as well as cans of corn, green beans and jellied cranberry sauce, and volunteers prepare and deliver the meals to families.

  • Civic groups back creation of commission to review unification

    Two rural civic groups have approved resolutions in favor of studying government unification in Hardin County.

    The Cecilia Ruritan Club and Glendale Lions Club voted to endorse formation of a unification review commission that would draft a plan for consideration by voters.

    Members of both clubs said the decisions were reached to resolve lingering questions they feel cannot be answered without the review commission’s creation.

  • Farm-City Day offers Fort Knox tour today

    Tuesday marks this year’s Farm-City Day, an annual event during which the farming community and Hardin County Chamber of Commerce get together and “share notes,” chamber President Brad Richardson said.

    This year the chamber was responsible for organizing the event, which changes hands year-to-year, he said.

    Farm-City Day begins at 8 a.m. at the American Legion Post on Ring Road, where pastries and coffee will be offered, he said, and at 8:30 a.m. a bus will transport participants to Fort Knox for a tour.

  • Diabetes Day meant to educate residents

    Area medical representatives and community service organizations will try today to educate residents about managing diabetes and avoiding the disease.

    The disease is a metabolic disorder in which a person doesn’t produce enough insulin, which is used to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy.

    November is Diabetes Awareness Month, and today is World Diabetes Day.

  • Senior life: Answering a child’s questions about Alzheimer’s disease

    Kids ask the darnest questions. While a child’s questions often test an adult’s knowledge or skill level, and sometimes can push their patience, their questions have value and must be acknowledged.
    “Why does grandpa act like he’s forgotten everyone?”
    “Will I catch Alzheimer’s from grandma?”
    “How come grandpa keeps calling me by dad’s name?”
    “Will grandma die from Alzheimer’s?”

  • New traffic signal activated today

    A new traffic signal goes into effect today on Ring Road at the intersection with Peterson Drive near Akebono.

    The signal was set to flash yellow last week and it becomes fully activated today by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.
     

  • Senior Life: Answering a child’s questions about Alzheimer’s

    Kids ask the darnest questions. While a child’s questions often test an adult’s knowledge or skill level, and sometimes can push their patience, their questions have value and must be acknowledged.

    “Why does grandpa act like he’s forgotten everyone?”

    “Will I catch Alzheimer’s from grandma?”

    “How come grandpa keeps calling me by dad’s name?”

    “Will grandma die from Alzheimer’s?”

  • Crafters sell goods, make friends at Holiday Marketplace

    Vendors at the Elizabethtown Junior Women’s Club’s Holiday Marketplace over the weekend said the best part of participating in the craft fair was meeting people and socializing.

    That activity is as important for health as for personal enjoyment for Linda Hornback of Hodgenville.

    She had to close her florist shop several years ago after she was diagnosed with lung cancer. She had a brain aneurysm, suffered two heart attacks and was diagnosed with diabetes in the years that followed.