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Local News

  • Committee to explore Civil War battle-site designation for E'town

    Area history lovers are joining together to more efficiently promote Hardin County’s past.

    They plan to do that by forming a history and heritage committee through the Elizabethtown-Hardin County Heritage Council, the Ancestral Trails Historical Society and the Hardin County History Museum, said Heath Seymor, executive director of the Heritage Council.

    “This is a Heritage Council committee, but it involves everybody,” he said.

  • Horse College returns

    Aspiring horse caretakers can learn the basics in an upcoming series of presentations.

    The series, Kentucky Heartland 2012 Horse College, is organized by the University of Kentucky and is meant to provide basic information to anyone interested in learning to care for horses.

    The last horse college session was in 2006 and drew 30 to 40 participants for every presentation, said Doug Shepherd, Hardin County Extension agent for agriculture and natural resources.

  • Senators offer the ‘why’ of votes

    First-term state Sen. Dennis Parrett described it as “one of the most agonizing decisions on a bill to date” and a neighboring senator took a position contrary to others in Republican leadership.

    A proposed constitutional amendment that would allow expanded gaming and potentially lead to casinos in Kentucky failed 21-16 in a Senate vote last week. Parrett, D-Elizabethtown, and Carroll Gibson, R-Leitchfield, both voted in favor of the legislation and stressed public interest in the question over personal or political preferences.

  • Downtown biz to cater to legal eagles

    A local attorney and her husband plan to turn an empty building in downtown Elizabethtown into a business retreat and  restaurant which the mayor hopes will serve as a catalyst to attract more businesses.

    Roxann and Ronald Smalley purchased 114 E. Dixie Ave. beside the Hardin County Justice Center, which will be transformed into Justice Place, a multi-purpose facility offering everything from food to lounge space and a business center. The facility is scheduled to open June 30, barring renovation delays.

  • Photo: Memorials in motion
  • Buddhist monk returning to speak at ECTC

    A popular visitor to the local community college is making a return visit this week.

    The Venerable Tsering Phuntsok, a Buddhist monk from Bir, India who visited Elizabethtown Community and Technical College, is returning to speak to students and the community about the Dalai Lama.

    Phuntsok will be at ECTC at 3 p.m. Thursday in Room 112 of the Administration Building. His talk is called “The Dalai Lama: His Life and Teachings.”

  • Senior Life: The oxygen mask theory

    If you’ve ever flown on an airplane, you’ve heard the flight attendants go over important instructions prior to take off: Emergency exits are located on the right and left, seat cushions may be used as floatation devices and in the event air pressure drops in the cabin, put the oxygen mask on yourself before others.

    Caregiving is much like those instructions. They may sound simple, or silly, but knowing what to do in case of an emergency may help save your life. For this column’s purposes, these instructions may save your sanity and energy.

  • March of Dimes: West family has twice the stories as ambassadors

    At 24 weeks pregnant and already two centimeters dilated, Serena West was put on bedrest until she delivered her daughter. Doctors and nurses began to fill her in on what she could expect for the rest of her pregnancy, however long that would be. She was given a rule — don’t search for information about premature babies on the Internet because it would just scare her, she said. But she didn’t listen.

    “The first thing I did was start Googling,” she said, chuckling.

  • Bowl for Kids’ Sake rolls toward goal

    Bowl for Kids’ Sake knocked down all 10 pins this weekend.

    The fundraiser for Big Brothers  Big Sisters was off to a good start as Emily Reder, branch development director for BBBS of Kentuckiana, estimated the group would end Saturday with more than $10,000.

    The Saturday morning bowl was full, and the afternoon saw the first-ever Big/Little Bowl, which raised more than $2,000.

    “We’ve had more Bigs bowl this year than ever before,” Reder said.

  • Star of 'Little People, Big World' coming for April program

    Money raised by an event geared toward women will go back to help them, too.

    SpringHaven Domestic Violence Shelter is hosting its first G.R.A.C.E conference, which stands for Get Real And Create Excellence, this spring. It offers women several workshops and an opportunity to hear from Amy Roloff, the star of “Little People, Big World,” Sheila Ray Charles, daughter of Ray Charles, and Christian comedians The Spa Girls.