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Today's News

  • Speakers with Spark: Good things start with self-respect

    By Sheila O’Mara

    Have you heard? There is a growing epidemic sweeping our nation. It is claiming the well-being of thousands of people and is changing the shape of our society. It is altering lives and not necessarily for the better. What is the cause of this growing epidemic?  That would be an overabundant lack of self-respect.

  • The List: Mother's Day flowers

    If you’re a mother, there’s a good chance your near future is flowering. And if you have a mother, pondering a plant purchase is probable. Flowers and plants are undeniably popular Mother’s Day gifts — fitting, as flowers are plain pretty and, with love and care, keep growing. Here are a few interesting facts about Mother’s Day flowers from the Society of American Florists.

  • Festival showcase art, crafts by women

    The third annual Every Woman’s Arts and Crafts Spring Festival will showcase creations from fine art, jewelry and pottery to handmade soaps and candles from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Colvin Community Center in Radcliff. About 35 artists and crafters will be on hand.

  • Teen sentenced to 30 years for friend's killing

    Jason Gowers, one of three Louisville teenagers charged in connection with a homicide, was sentenced to 30 years in prison Tuesday for his role in the slaying, which the judge described as “horrendous.”

    Gowers went before Circuit Judge Kelly Mark Easton for sentencing after pleading guilty in March to charges of complicity to commit murder and complicity to tamper with physical evidence.

    Gowers was arrested and charged in connection with the November killing of 18-year-old Mackenzie Smyser along with teens Ryan Wilt and Connor Galenski.

  • Gray pleads not guilty, possible trial date set

    A former Central Hardin High School teacher could be headed to trial in the fall on sex crime charges.

    Steven Blake Gray entered a plea of not guilty Tuesday to charges of sexual abuse at his arraignment in front of Circuit Judge Kelly Mark Easton. A meeting with attorneys was scheduled for Aug. 1, and if no agreements can be reached at that time, trial is scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. Oct. 10.

  • PREP BASEBALL-SOFTBALL: North Hardin in two postponed 17th District games today (05/04)

    More rain moved into the area late Monday and into Tuesday, forcing the cancellation of several prep baseball and softball games.

    In baseball, two 17th District games were pushed back. North Hardin was scheduled to play at John Hardin on Tuesday, but that game was moved to 5:30 p.m. today. John Hardin coach Adam Lindsey said the game could get moved again if the Bulldogs’ field isn’t playable. Central Hardin and Fort Knox were supposed to meet at 5:30 Tuesday, but that game has been moved to 5:30 Friday.

  • PREP SOFTBALL: John Hardin's Greenwell is made for Manhattan (05/04)

    Olivia Greenwell is giving up cleats, curveballs and corner kicks for Calvin Klein and forgetting about fielding ground balls to focus on Gucci.

    For the John Hardin High School senior, the next month is the last of her athletic career. While many of her fellow graduates will prepare for their freshman year of college later this summer, Greenwell is taking the path less traveled – to one of the most heavily traveled places in the country.

    Greenwell is an early acceptant to New York’s fashion-focused LIM College in midtown Manhattan.

  • PREP SOFTBALL: John Hardin's Greenwell is made for Manhattan (05/04)

    For the John Hardin High School senior, the next month is the last of her athletic career. While many of her fellow graduates will prepare for their freshman year of college later this summer, Greenwell is taking the path less traveled – to one of the most heavily traveled places in the country.

    Greenwell is an early acceptant to New York’s fashion-focused Laboratory Institute of Merchandising in midtown Manhattan.

  • Two views: The case against hunting sandhill cranes

    If they are allowed to go through with it, the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources will allow for the first time in more than 100 years the hunting of sandhill cranes in Kentucky.
    Under what KDFWR calls a sandhill crane management plan, hunters will be allowed to buy permits and shoot the birds as they migrate through the commonwealth in the winter months.

  • Two views: The case for hunting sandhill cranes

    The eastern population of sandhill cranes migrates through and winters in portions of Kentucky. Sandhill cranes are the most abundant crane species on the planet, with more than 700,000 spending part of their year in North America. The eastern population is the world’s second largest, numbering between 60,000 and 100,000 birds.
    The population continues to grow and has become increasingly visible in Kentucky in recent years. Peak counts in Kentucky now approach 20,000 cranes in the Barren River Lake area.