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Today's News

  • Easter wins District 1 magisterial primary

    By KELLY R. CANTRALL

    kcantrall@thenewsenterprise.com

    A former magistrate may have another chance to serve Hardin County after coming out ahead in Tuesday’s election.

    Democrat Roy Easter won his party’s District 1 magisterial primary, garnering 235 votes, almost 35 percent of the 675 votes cast for the district. Easter served as a magistrate from 1998 to 2006, and is a former Radcliff police chief.

    Several phone calls to Easter’s home went unanswered.

  • Sports league challenges proposed tobacco ban

    By MARTY FINLEY

    mfinley@thenewsenterprise.com

    Radcliff city officials on Wednesday heard the first reading of an ordinance that would ban tobacco products entirely in city parks and the Saunders Spring Nature Preserve.

    The proposed ordinance would toughen the city’s smoking laws further after it adopted a comprehensive ordinance late last year that banned smoking in public facilities.

  • Ask the Expert: Make physical activity a part of your life

    By DONNY GILL

    For some people, “exercise” is a dirty word. The fact remains, however, that almost everyone can improve their health through physical activity.

  • April 30 Building Permits

    The following building permit information has been obtained from Hardin County Planning and Development Commission and the City of Elizabethtown Planning and Development offices. The name of the applicant, applicant’s address and use of permit are listed.

    James Russell Johnson, 509 Partridge Way, Elizabethtown. Use: addition.

    William Rademacher, 105 Blue Ball Road, Rineyville. Use: garage.

    Allen’s Air Conditioning, 1302 Old E'town Road, Hodgenville. Use; addition.

    Lisa Waldeck-Huffer, 2635 Middle Creek Road, Elizabethtown. Use: addition.

  • May 18, 2010: Obituaries

    Alma A. Benningfield

    Alma A. Benningfield, 95, of Hodgenville, passed away, Monday, May 17, 2010, at Sunrise Manor Nursing Home in Hodgenville.

    Professing faith in Christ when she was nine years old, she was a member of Pleasant Ridge Separate Baptist Church, where she taught Sunday school and directed Christmas and other programs for more than 60 years.

  • Some shed under the rainbow
  • Where they're playing

    Concert may include admission even if not listed.

    May 22

    Mamakitty Southwood will perform at Union Station, 9302 Blue Lick Road, Louisville, (502) 969-6398, 8 p.m.

    May 27

    Fall N Disgize will perform at Hot Topic in Towne Mall in Elizabethtown, (270) 766-1470, 7:30 p.m.

    May 28

    Wild Revolution will perform at 3-Putt Willie's at Pine Valley Golf Resort in Elizabethtown, (270) 737-8300, 9 p.m.

  • May 19, 2010: Services

    Alma A. Benningfield, 95, of Hodgenville, died Monday, May 17, 2010. The funeral is at 2 p.m. today at Pleasant Ridge Separate Baptist Church with burial in the church cemetery. Visitation continues at 9 a.m. today at Dixon-Rogers Funeral Home in Magnolia.

    Charles V. Cox, 74, of Elizabethtown, formerly of Stuart, Va., died Thursday, May 13, 2010. A graveside service was Monday at Patrick Memorial Gardens in Stuart. A celebration of life is from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday at Northside Baptist Church in Elizabethtown.

  • Crowded magisterial fields narrowed

    By JOHN FRIEDLEIN

    jfriedlein@thenewsenterprise.com

    Tuesday’s primary pared Hardin County’s large magistrate field down from almost 50 to just 16 candidates.

    Winners included a mix of former magistrates and those who have never held public office.

    The eight candidates who win in November’s general election will make up a fiscal court that will have reverted from a short-lived commissioner system.

  • Highway workers bring May flowers

    By JOHN FRIEDLEIN

    jfriedlein@thenewsenterprise.com

    With Memorial Day coming up, it’s good time to consider of vibrant red poppies alongside a ramp from U.S. 62 to the Elizabethtown bypass.

    Corn poppies such as these — a different type than the one that delayed Dorothy — are featured in the World War I poem, “In Flanders Fields,” and have become a symbol of military sacrifice. The red flowers bloomed in the European battlefields.