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Today's News

  • Buggeland pleads guilty to killing parents

    Before entering a guilty but mentally ill plea Thursday, Erik Buggeland asked his attorney where his parents are buried.

    On Sept. 20, 2010, after an argument with his father, the 36-year-old repeatedly struck his parents, Terje and Margaret Buggeland, with a dumbbell at their Shepherdsville Road home in Elizabethtown, Detective Jonathon Vaughn of Kentucky State Police said.

    Terje Buggeland also was stabbed, Vaughn said.

    When Circuit Judge Ken Howard asked if Vaughn’s summary of his actions was accurate, Buggeland agreed it was.

  • Buggeland pleads guilty to double murder

    Erik Buggeland, charged in the killings of his parents at their Shepherdsville Road home on Sept. 20, 2010, pleaded guilty Thursday morning to the charges, claiming he is mentally ill.

    Buggeland will be sentenced Jan. 24. The Commonwealth has offered a sentence of life without the possibility of parole for 20 years to the defense. Circuit Judge Ken Howard could reject the plea agreement before sentencing, but the judge said that happens "infrequently."

  • Teen survived nearly fatal medical condition

    At a time when North Hardin High School student Brittany Page should have been looking forward to her junior year, she was struggling for her life.

    The Radcliff student was 17 last year when she experienced a brain aneurysm.

    Terrie, Brittany’s mother, recalled the bleak prognosis from physicians.

    “They weren’t too encouraging,” Terrie said.

    The date the family will remember is Sept. 25, 2010.

  • Community event to embrace homeless

    An Elizabethtown resident is drawing on her faith and experience to stage a community event for all area residents, especially those who don’t have a home to go to during Christmas.

    Lisa Weaver and her husband began having gatherings with family, friends and music three years ago in their Stephensburg home.

    Weaver said the couple wanted to host a similar event when they downsized and moved to Elizabethtown.

    “Before I knew it, it started to get bigger,” she said.

  • 'White Christmas' shows at Historic State Theater

    Holiday treats and horse-drawn carriage rides will be offered to get patrons in the Christmas spirit when the Historic State Theater holds showings of “White Christmas.”

    The 1954 holiday classic, starring Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye and Rosemary Clooney, plays at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Saturday.

    Known for Crosby’s famous rendition of “White Christmas,” the movie involves a song and dance duo who get involved with a sister act and try to save a failing Vermont inn.

  • Christmas spirit starts early for writer

    As the year rolls on quickly to its end, I find myself faced with the challenge of finding the time to get into the Christmas spirit.

    This might not be a problem for most; diving into the holiday season right after Thanksgiving is plenty of time for many.

    Not me.

    It really takes me quite a while to work myself into the Christmas spirit. If I had to wait until the end of November to start decorating, I probably wouldn’t even make the effort.

  • Sherlock Holmes is even better the second time around

    Guy Ritchie and the Sherlock Holmes gang have successfully created a sequel even better than its predecessor in “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows.”

    The film gives several nods to the original works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. First, Dr. Watson is writing the story. In most of the Holmes books, Watson is chronicling the duo’s adventure.

  • Another stone in the wall
  • Chamber gets festive

    The Hardin County Chamber of Commerce raided Santa’s reserves at the North Pole this week.

    Celebrating the holiday season at its December luncheon, the chamber handed out dozens of gifts to visitors and offered a smorgasbord of food from local businesses and organizations, the proceeds of which will help needy families have a special Christmas of their own.

  • Federal government needs to apply REINS

    ISSUE: Federal regulatory agencies
    OUR VIEW: System should include Congress

    Two Kentucky legislators are at the forefront of Congressional action designed to rein in the federal government and reaffirm the time-honored system of checks and balances that made the nation great.