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Today's News

  • Allen Baugh: Doing what hits his warm button

    At age 81, Allen Baugh’s life is a mix of farming, faith, science and craftsmanship.

    He’s farmed all his life. He was born near West Point and his family moved to Jefferson County in the mid 1940s. In 1955, the family moved to farm in Hardin County and he’s lived in Hardin County ever since.

    Farming has always been something he enjoyed.

    “It just hits my warm button,” he said.

  • Scouts honored at first class banquet

    Eighteen First Class Scouts were honored at the Lincoln Trail District First Class Banquet on Oct. 27. Tony Rose, a survivor of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack on the Pentagon, was the guest speaker.
    Eighty Scouts, parents and guests attended the banquet at the White Mills Christian Camp dining hall. Souvenir pocket knives were presented to the Scouts who had achieved first class rank since Sept. 1, 2010. Troops with First Class Scouts present included troops 134, 155, 233, 244, 600 and 829.

  • Auxiliary raises money for Wreaths Across America

    The Ladies Auxiliary of Ritchie-Trent American Legion Post No. 148 in West Point wanted to help raise money for Wreaths Across America, a non-profit organization dedicated to placement of live evergreen wreaths on the tombstones of veterans throughout America.

  • John Hardin, LaRue County high schools to perform at inauguration

    Fresh off a third-place finish in Class 4-A last month in the state marching band competition, the John Hardin High School band performs this month to an even broader audience at inauguration ceremonies for Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear.

    The inauguration is Dec. 13 in Frankfort.

    The marching band will perform the Commonwealth of Kentucky’s state song, “My Old Kentucky Home,” in front of the governor’s reviewing stand that day.

  • Gregory speaks to Ancestral Trails Historical Society on DNA

    At the November meeting of Ancestral Trails Historical Society, Melvin Gregory explained how DNA could be used in genealogy to break down brick walls that a genealogist may have. He used a PowerPoint presentation to explain the DNA program he used, explain-ing how it helped him discover new relatives, some from Great Britain.
    The next meeting of Ancestral Trails is at 6:30 p.m. Friday at Hardin County Public Library in Elizabethtown. There will be election of officers for the coming year, followed by the annual potluck Christmas party.
     

  • Students honored at the Music Studio of Terry Strange

     
    The Music Studio of Terry Strange recently honored two students for outstanding work on their music studies.
    Owen Cranmer was given a Star Student Award for his hard work on learning guitar as a newer student, and Carson Ching was given the Young Student of the Month Award for his accomplishments and hard work in his guitar classes.

  • Lions Club members welcome Natalie Smith

  • McMillens celebrate 70th anniversary

    Earl Jr. and Eileen McMillen of Elizabethtown celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary Nov. 28, 2011.
    They were married Nov. 28, 1941, in Jeffersonville, Ind.
    They have three children, Susie Woosley, Spike McMillen and Mark McMillen, all of Elizabethtown; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

  • CHHS students dance in Macy's parade

    Local dancers missed their chance to watch the annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade at home. They were too busy participating in it.

    Three Central Hardin High School students traveled to New York City last week to dance in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. The seniors participated through Center Stage Dance Studio, which sends some students every year to be a part of the Spirit of America Dance Team.

  • Live-cut tree sales dwindle

    Area sellers of live and live-cut Christmas trees say they are selling fewer than in the past.

    Opinions differ regarding why that change is occurring.

    John Effinger, owner and manager of Frank Otte Nursery on Ring Road in Elizabethtown, thinks allergies are to blame. His grandchildren’s allergies are why he and his wife had to buy an artificial tree after bringing live-cut trees into their home every year as they raised their own children.

    “I think the environment is too clean today,” he said.