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Today's News

  • Sept. 24 Editorial: It's an ace for local tennis enthusiasts

    Bo O'Brien loves tennis, and he is making many others, young and old, feel the same way he does about the sport.

    If anyone knows O'Brien, they shouldn't be surprised that he has taken on the leadership of the Elizabethtown Tennis Commission full throttle and led an energized push of interest in the sport locally.

    Visit the University Drive courts almost any night during the summer, and you will see courts filled to capacity. During the day there are instructional camps going on and more recreational play.

  • Oct. 6 editorial: Don't be infected with bad information

            Bad information is infectious. And, unfortunately, it’s all around.

    With the H1N1 virus it is no different; and it’s only a mouse click or conversation away.

  • Oct. 16 Building Permits

    The following building permit information has been obtained from Hardin County Planning and Development Commission and the City of Elizabethtown Planning and Development offices. The name of the applicant, applicant’s address and use of permit are listed.

    Bruce Beasely, 43 Beasley Boulevard, county. Use: single-family dwelling.

    Joey Vinson, lot 51 Searcy Lane, county. Use: single-family dwelling

    Double L Construction, 61 Ambrook Estates, county. Use: single-family dwelling.

  • Oct. 9 Building Permits

    The following building permit information has been obtained from Hardin County Planning and Development Commission and the City of Elizabethtown Planning and Development offices. The name of the applicant, applicant’s address and use of permit are listed.

    John B. Miller, 356 Amy Ave., Elizabethtown. Use: garage.

    Dewey D. Childress, 800 Mack Thomas Road, Elizabethtown. Use; garage.

    Brian Potter, 118 Belaire Drive, Rineyville. Use: porch.

    Doug Cox, 3 Ambrook Estates, county. Use: single-family dwelling.

  • Sept. 25: Our readers write

    Bravo Berry

  • ECTC instructor accused of indecent exposure

    By BOB WHITE

    bwhite@thenewsenterprise.com

    ELIZABETHTOWN – An instructor at Elizabethtown Community and Technical College will answer to multiple charges of indecent exposure Nov. 2, the date of his scheduled arraignment in Hardin District Court.

  • Sept. 27 editorial: A hand at the helm

    For the third time since 2005 the Elizabethtown Independent Schools board is beginning a new search for a  superintendent to lead one of the top-achieving school districts in the state. While other districts set their sights on getting into the top 10 percent, academically, Elizabethtown’s goal is No. 1.

    However, if the district’s leadership doesn’t take control of the revolving door on the superintendent’s office, and do it soon, that goal unfortunately will remain elusive.

  • Sept. 27: Our readers write

    Vote ’em out

    If the information I received is correct,and it usually is, for the first time in history, the Democrat-controlled Congress will not allow an increase in the Social Security cost of living adjustment.

    The Henry J.Kaiser Family Foundation predicts there may not be any COLA for the next three years.

  • MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALL: Frazier leads Bluegrass to 26-12 win (10/22)

    By JOSH CLAYWELL jclaywell@thenewsenterprise.com RADCLIFF — Khalil Frazier single handedly kept the Bluegrass Colts’ hopes of a two-peat alive Wednesday night. The eighth-grader scored two touchdowns and had 213 all-purpose yards to lead the homestanding Colts past Shelby West, 26-12 in the first round of the Eighth Grade Division I State Playoffs at John Hardi

  • Oct. 13 editorial: Kentucky Constitution should have the last word

    In 2006, the Kentucky General Assembly passed legislation signed into law by the governor requiring registered sex offenders to live more than 1,000 feet from schools, day care centers or playgrounds. The intent of the law was not to penalize convicted individuals, but to offer a degree of insulation around places with high concentrations of children. However, Kentucky’s supreme court ruled that law unconstitutional Oct. 1, saying the blanket ruling did not distinguish between sex offenders convicted before its passing in 2006 and those convicted after.