Today's News

  • Traffic patrol eases the flow at ECTC

    Because of expectations of heavy back-to-school traffic, Elizabethtown Community and Technical College contracted for extra security at least for the first week of school.

    Mike Burns, ECTC security supervisor, said the Fraternal Order of Police provided officers to help control traffic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at two of the college’s entrances — the main entrance at College Street Road and St. John Road at University Drive.

    Contracting out the traffic officers is a “new thing” for ECTC, Burns said.

  • MWR makes critical decisions

    And the band played on and on.

    Despite the cancellation of southern rock legend Lynyrd Skynyrd for Saturday’s concert at Fort Knox, some quick thinking and a kind gesture made the concert series a hit again.

    About 3,600 fans came out to a free concert featuring the Doobie Brothers and Kansas, the classic rock group which was a last-minute replacement for Lynyrd Skynyrd after the hospitalization of a band member.

  • Vine Grove teen becomes state's youngest pilot

    Charlie Morris always knew he would fly an airplane some day.

    His father and grandfather both did it, and the freshman at North Hardin High School often rode in a small plane with his father.

    “It’s in our blood,” he said. “I knew I was going to, and my dad knew it.”

    Charlie, of Vine Grove, didn’t know that his first solo flight in a Schweitzer 2-33 glider on Aug. 6 would make him the youngest pilot in the state.

  • Guthrie: Credit downgrade 'embarrassing' for U.S.

    U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie, R-Bowling Green, said the United States’ credit downgrade from AAA to AA+ by Standard & Poor’s is an embarrassment for a country that has allowed its debt to spiral out of control.
    Guthrie sat down with The News-Enterprise on Friday to discuss the debt ceiling agreement and recent stock market fluctuations.
    America now holds credit worthiness lower than France, Guthrie said, but the downgrade is more of a failure by the U.S. to meet S&P’s desire to see a larger reduction in the national debt.

  • My Old Kentucky stopover: Sandhill cranes make habit of Cecilia visit

    When sandhill cranes pick something, they like to stick with it.
    Up to 7,000 of the tall gray birds – which are in the news as Kentuckians debate whether to hunt them – stop for a few weeks each winter near Cecilia on their way back north for the summer. They keep returning even though a tornado killed more than 20 of them there a few years ago.
    “They’re real creatures of habit,” retired state biologist Brainard Palmer-Ball Jr. said. Living more than two decades, the cranes recognize places they’ve been before.

  • Elizabethtown man arrested on sexual assault charges

    An Elizabethtown man on the Sex Offender Registry was arrested Saturday on further sexual assault charges.

    Kelly Charles Ferguson, 35, was arrested Saturday afternoon on charges of first-degree rape, first-degree sodomy and failure to comply with the Sex Offender Registry in the first degree. The registry listed a Kentucky Drive address for him.
    He was lodged in Hardin County Detention Center.

  • Senior life: Who has one big, happy family?

    Ever heard the expression “one big happy family,” and then wonder whose family?
    The answer to the question about this old cliché is no family lives this perfect scenario. Unfortunately, difficult times test even the best families and can leave relationships strained or broken.

  • Human remains found in Meade County

    Human remains were discovered Sunday on the banks of the Ohio River in Meade County.

    Boaters found the remains early in the afternoon, according to a news release from Kentucky State Police. The remains will be taken to the State Medical Examiner’s Office for possible identification.

    Kentucky Fish & Wildlife, Indiana conservation officers, Meade County Fire Department and the Meade County Coroner assisted Kentucky State Police at the scene.

  • Clark hired as Lakewood principal

    Lakewood Elementary School has one of its own taking the helm this school year.

    Shelee Clark has taken the job of principal after serving as assistant principal at the school for a little more than a year.

    Clark replaces Kerry Reeves, who retired in August. Clark has held a variety of positions in the Hardin County Schools district and taught at Lakewood for five years.

    Clark worked closely with Reeves during her time as assistant principal, she said. Reeves believed all administrators should know what principal duties entail, she said.

  • Unification supporters to approach more organizations

    More residents and civic organizations will be asked to support a proposal to form a commission that would draft a plan for a unified county government.

    Hardin County United on Friday announced its first formal support from a community organization for forming a unification review commission. The Hardin County Public Library Board of Trustees approved a resolution Thursday calling for its establishment.

    If formed, the commission would develop a plan for a unified government to be presented to voters in November 2012.