.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Committee to explore Civil War battle-site designation for E'town

    Area history lovers are joining together to more efficiently promote Hardin County’s past.

    They plan to do that by forming a history and heritage committee through the Elizabethtown-Hardin County Heritage Council, the Ancestral Trails Historical Society and the Hardin County History Museum, said Heath Seymor, executive director of the Heritage Council.

    “This is a Heritage Council committee, but it involves everybody,” he said.

  • Horse College returns

    Aspiring horse caretakers can learn the basics in an upcoming series of presentations.

    The series, Kentucky Heartland 2012 Horse College, is organized by the University of Kentucky and is meant to provide basic information to anyone interested in learning to care for horses.

    The last horse college session was in 2006 and drew 30 to 40 participants for every presentation, said Doug Shepherd, Hardin County Extension agent for agriculture and natural resources.

  • Senators offer the ‘why’ of votes

    First-term state Sen. Dennis Parrett described it as “one of the most agonizing decisions on a bill to date” and a neighboring senator took a position contrary to others in Republican leadership.

    A proposed constitutional amendment that would allow expanded gaming and potentially lead to casinos in Kentucky failed 21-16 in a Senate vote last week. Parrett, D-Elizabethtown, and Carroll Gibson, R-Leitchfield, both voted in favor of the legislation and stressed public interest in the question over personal or political preferences.

  • Project Princess uses dresses as community outreach

    Girls trying to avoid seeing dollar signs as they readied themselves for prom had the perfect alternative this weekend.
    Project Princess, a program through which girls can borrow a free prom dress for the night, returned Saturday and reached out to a larger number of schools this time around.

    Coordinators Tiffany Gilpin and Brittany Hawkins contacted local schools as well as those in Grayson, LaRue, Meade, Nelson and Breckinridge counties to let students know about the opportunity to save money on formal attire and accessories.

  • Downtown biz to cater to legal eagles

    A local attorney and her husband plan to turn an empty building in downtown Elizabethtown into a business retreat and  restaurant which the mayor hopes will serve as a catalyst to attract more businesses.

    Roxann and Ronald Smalley purchased 114 E. Dixie Ave. beside the Hardin County Justice Center, which will be transformed into Justice Place, a multi-purpose facility offering everything from food to lounge space and a business center. The facility is scheduled to open June 30, barring renovation delays.

  • This Digital Life: A computer’s built-in browser isn’t always best

    As better options present themselves, the once-dominant king of the Web browsers, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, continues to lose users.

    It once was common for people who bought a new computer to just use the browser that came with their system.

    At its peak in the latter half of 2004, the default browser for Windows, Internet Explorer, claimed more than 92 percent of the market.Today, it accounts for less than half.

  • Steve Sherrard makes the wheels on the Bulldogs’ bus go ’round and ’round

    Steve Sherrard is more than a bus driver to the John Hardin High School boys’ basketball team and coaches.

    “The players and coaches look to Steve as part of our staff,” head varsity coach Mark Wells said.

    They jokingly refer to Sherrard as director of basketball operations.

    “He is more than just our bus driver, though he is very skilled and professional about his driving,” Wells said.

    The players often call him Mr. Sherrard.

  • Photo: Memorials in motion
  • County could earn Bucks for Bright Ideas

    While most everyone thinks they should get paid for their good ideas, Hardin County residents have a rare opportunity to make that happen this spring.

    The Central Region Innovation and Commercialization Center at Western Kentucky University is accepting applications for this year’s Bucks for Bright Ideas competition. The center, which has a branch in Hardin County, is taking ideas for potential products or services from residents in 26 counties. Applications will be accepted through April 18.

  • Buddhist monk returning to speak at ECTC

    A popular visitor to the local community college is making a return visit this week.

    The Venerable Tsering Phuntsok, a Buddhist monk from Bir, India who visited Elizabethtown Community and Technical College, is returning to speak to students and the community about the Dalai Lama.

    Phuntsok will be at ECTC at 3 p.m. Thursday in Room 112 of the Administration Building. His talk is called “The Dalai Lama: His Life and Teachings.”