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Today's News

  • Cadet Command nearing full transition to Fort Knox

    Maj. Gen. Mark McDonald on Saturday said his unit, U.S. Army Cadet Command, is about 72 percent of the way transitioned to Fort Knox as part of the Base Realignment and Closure Initiative.

  • Faces and Places: Game faces

    Basketball season is over for area high schools as the six local teams were elimenated from 5th Region Tournament action. On the boys’ side, Elizabethtown, John Hardin and LaRue County high schools and for the girls’, LaRue County, North Hardin and Elizabethtown high schools went to 5th Region tournaments.

  • Story songs describe the realities of life, love and loss

    Strumming a guitar, playing a keyboard and beating a drum all are beyond my capabilities. It’s a challenge just to tap my feet or clap in time.

    Despite being tone deaf and rhythmically challenged, somehow country music still speaks to me.

    It’s the words, of course. More specifically, the stories included with the tunes, that take hold.

  • Tsunami concerns Hardin County residents

    The tsunami that struck Japan and then diminished in force as it struck Hawaii and the coast of California has caused some concern among local families and officials.

    Others are relieved that nothing happened to their loved ones.
    Mayor Tim Walker said on Friday afternoon that officials have been trying to contact Elizabethtown’s sister city in Japan, Koori-Machi, to see how much the city was impacted by the tsunami.

  • Safer 65 resolutions ask the state for action

    ISSUE: Improvements to Interstate 65
    OUR VIEW:
    Public should push the idea

    From three county courthouses, judge-executives are calling for action to address Interstate 65 improvements as an urgent matter of public safety.

    Visitors, guests and passers-by decry the discomfort and potential hazard of being squeezed from six driving lanes to four along the 38-mile stretch from Park City to Elizabethtown.

  • National leaders attend PASS launch at North Middle

    Some of the highest ranking officials in education and the U.S. Army visited North Middle School to celebrate the launch Friday of a new national program called Project PASS.

    U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, U.S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. George W. Casey and Brenda Welburn, executive director of the National Association of State Boards of Education, joined Nannette Johnston, superintendent of Hardin County Schools, and staff and students at North Middle School and J.T. Alton Middle School in the ceremony.

  • Fourth trial to begin in Burke double-homicide case

    On Monday, a familiar process will begin anew as Hardin Circuit Judge Kelly Mark Easton starts to whittle through a roughly 230-member jury pool for the fourth trial of U.S. Army Sgt. Brent Burke

    Easton has told potential jurors to avoid audio, video and print media coverage of any court case prior to the jury selection and gave attorneys on both sides a list of questions that likely will be asked of the jury pool.

  • Feeding America sees increase in volunteers

    Advertising and a new building have helped increase the number of volunteers at Feeding America, Kentucky’s Heartland.

    That means more food going out the door to help people and a possible increase in the number of volunteer work nights from one each week to two or three.

  • Therapy dogs demonstrate benefits of animals in reading program

    North Hardin High School had some furry visitors Friday.

    Harper, a handicapped German shepherd mix, and Grendel, an American bulldog, were on hand to help demonstrate the benefits of the Reading Education Assistance Dogs program, which uses canines to attract children to reading.

    Lisa Ramsey, who teaches nonverbal special needs students American Sign Language at North Hardin, approached the school about the opportunity to perform a demonstration, which gained the attention of teacher Rachel Wilson.

  • Holy Harmonica: The Waste Band has a rockn' priest and parishioners

    While some ministers play golf, fish or hunt, Chuck Walker, pastor of St. James Catholic Church in Elizabethtown, likes to play the harmonica in the Waste Band, he said.

    Some weekends he’ll play in the band on Saturday nights and then get up for Mass on Sunday morning.

    “This Waste Band thing is a nice, clean, relaxing and entertaining way to relieve a little stress and enjoy the company of others —in the band and in the audience,” he said.