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Today's News

  • Life-long volunteer, artist dies

    By JOHN FRIEDLEIN jfriedlein@thenewsenterprise.com An Elizabethtown woman who overcame daunting challenges and impacted the lives of other people through her art and volunteerism died earlier this week. Born nearly deaf and diagnosed with a neuromuscular disease 22 years ago, Elizabeth “Joann” Hornback served the American Red Cross for most of her life and founded a program to tea

  • 10th District state Senate recommendation

    In the 10th District race for Kentucky Senate incumbent Elizabeth Tori faces Dennis Parrett.

    Tori, a Republican, has long been known as a staunch advocate for veterans and the military and has been instrumental in championing related issues and pro-life initiatives. Her tenure has allowed her to be in positions critical to the base realignment process and to other important issues including expansion of water service in Hardin County and across the commonwealth.

  • 27th District state representative recommendation

    Voters who complain of a lack of quality candidates should consider the state representative race matching Republican challenger Dalton Jantzen of Payneville, an instructor at Elizabethtown Community and Technical College, against Democratic incumbent Jeff Greer, an insurance agent from Brandenburg.

    The 27th District legislative seat, which serves Meade County plus adjacent precincts at Fort Knox and West Point and stretches into Bullitt County, has two insightful contenders in the Nov. 2 general election.

  • Photo: Beneath the autumn moon
  • Elderly driver’s whereabouts before crash a mystery

    By BOB WHITE

    bwhite@thenewsenterprise.com

    Investigators continued Thursday to piece together events leading up to Wednesday morning’s crash on Interstate 65 that killed a McDaniels man.

    Where 78-year-old Mendle Hester was returning from, or heading to, when he lost control of his Jeep Liberty and crashed near an Elizabethtown exit ramp at 10 a.m. Wednesday remains unclear.

  • 17th District state representative recommendation

    Candidates for public office are easy to spot during election season. But elected public servants who show up year-round are more difficult to find.

    A four-term state representative from the 17th District, C.B. Embry of Morgantown is known for his legwork across the three-county service area. As he sees it, a hectic schedule of community meetings and events helps “stay in tune” with constituent interests, opinions and needs.

  • PREP VOLLEYBALL: Elizabethtown earns spot in region final (10/21)

     

  • Last-minute deal ends trial

    By BOB WHITE

    bwhite@thenewsenterprise.com

    Jurors on Wednesday were expecting to hear testimony in the state’s case against a 57-year-old man who Radcliff police say raped a 4-year-old twice last year.

    But an eleventh-hour plea deal Tuesday saved Ralph R. Bassitt Jr., and the child, from the pains of a trial.

    Bassitt was being prosecuted on two Class A felony counts of first-degree rape and incest.

    If convicted as charged, the Cypress Drive resident would have faced penalties ranging from 20 years to life in prison.

  • E'town council recommendations

    Once Elizabethtown voters rule on the fate of 19 candidates, certainly some capable and qualified people will not be selected. The city is blessed to have a ballot packed with quality individuals willing to serve.

    Some of the interest level is influenced by dissatisfaction with the current council's actions. In reviewing the field of candidates in detail, a need for new energy and new ideas surfaced. Two candidates with business success in different fields can provide that influence.

  • Conway campaigns on veterans issues

     

    By JOHN FRIEDLEIN jfriedlein@thenewsenterprise.com

    U.S. Senate candidate Jack Conway on Tuesday made a veterans issue out of his opponent’s comment about accessibility for workers with physical disabilities.

    Republican Rand Paul said during a National Public Radio interview in May that, instead of the government making a business install a $100,000 elevator for a handicapped employee, it might be reasonable to give him a first floor office.