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Today's News

  • TENNIS: Players, captains say solid debut for Central Kentucky Team Tennis (06/10)

    By NATHANIEL BRYAN

    nbryan@thenewsenterprise.com

    With her left Achilles throbbing due to tendonitis Wednesday night, E’town Fire Balls team member AnnLauren Fiepke went down the family tree to call in a reserve during her team’s inaugural match as Central Kentucky Team Tennis made its debut at Central Hardin High School in Cecilia.

    Fiepke, who just spent four consecutive days playing in the Joe Creason USTA Tournament in Louisville, asked younger sister and soon-to-be Elizabethtown High School teammate Natalie Fiepke to fill in for her.

  • The sweet side of turning 50

     

  • May 10, 2010: Our readers write

    Jenkins in District 7

    In 1983 I met Terry Jenkins and his family at Rineyville Baptist Church.

    Terry Jenkins is a very nice, truthful person. He will do his job well, do the right thing for people who elect him to office. He likes people.

    A problem or concern? Call on Terry Jenkins and help will be there. I called on Terry when no one else I called would even call me back. Last year Terry Jenkins took care of my problem. That’s why I know what he will do for people.

  • Clover takes toll on cattle herds

    By JOHN FRIEDLEIN

    jfriedlein@thenewsenterprise.com

    This spring’s clover explosion not only has made local lawns look like scenes of a popcorn spill, it has killed several cows in Hardin County within the past month.

    Weather conditions led to problems with the legume. The situation seems to be improving, though, said Hardin County Extension agent Doug Shepherd.

  • May 21, 2010, editorial: A loss in the community

    Charles Connor never wanted a pat on the back.

    If someone wanted to drop accolades on the Emma Reno Connor Black History Gallery, he was more than willing to take those on, but only in the name of the gallery. Connor only wanted recognition for the gallery, not for the work that he had put into it for many, many years.

    Connor died last week. He was 93.

    He and his late wife, Emma, opened the gallery in 1989, filling it with items through their many travels.

  • May 17, 2010: Our readers write

    Signs of hypocrisy

    In September of last year I sent a letter to the editor commenting on the sign ordinance that was enacted in 2008 by the city of Elizabethtown, dealing exclusively with signs for businesses. At that time, we were advertising the price of pergolas, with a sign attached to one. It was facing our building and was sitting on private land.

  • Gyllenhaal swashbuckles

     

  • Open Up! lineup offers taste of local musical talent

    The News-Enterprise

    The Open Up! series takes the stage again tonight at the Historic State Theater, 209 W. Dixie Ave., in Elizabethtown. The series features local bands and musical artists from Hardin and surrounding counties with each event highlighting a different local charity.

    Tonight's featured performers will include Matthew Pinkham, Katie McDaniel, Holly Brim, Ryan Severns, Robby Payne, Kevin Whitlock and The Upper Room.

  • May 19, 2010: Our readers write

    Assembly should follow Beshear’s lead On behalf of Kentucky’s small business community, I want to thank Governor Beshear for taking such a common-sense approach to resolving the state’s budget crisis. I especially want to thank him for coming out with a budget that doesn’t call for a tax increase and focuses cuts away from essential services. I believe it wou

  • Cautious cooking

    By MARTY FINLEY

    mfinley@thenewsenterprise.com

    Outdoor grilling is a summer staple in American lore — an act which brings together families and friends unified under blue skies and warm temperatures.

    But this family-friendly excursion can turn destructive if the proper caution is not taken when working with gas, charcoal and even electric grills.

    The U.S. Fire Administration reports grill mishaps lead to thousands of structure fires annually, with a combined direct property loss often exceeding $100 million.