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Today's News

  • Shelters provide hope, heat for many

    By BOB WHITE

    bwhite@thenewsenterprise.com

    HARDIN COUNTY – Radcliff firefighter Terry Grunden didn’t sleep much Tuesday night as he battled brutal winter weather as a police officer on patrol in Lebanon Junction.

    “It looked like a tornado hit Oak Street,” Grunden said.

    Wednesday morning, Grunden reported for duty as a Radcliff firefighter to face more of the same – ice, slush and snow; powerlines down, trees broken and residents without heat or lights.

  • Wait for power could be days long for some

    By JOHN FRIEDLEIN

    jfriedlein@thenewsenterprise.com

    HARDIN COUNTY — A major ice storm has knocked out power to tens of thousands of local residents — at a time when lows this weekend are expected to plunge to the low teens.

    It could be up to a week before all of the power is restored.

    “It is going to be a very slow process in restoring power,” said Vince Heuser, vice president of operations for Nolin RECC. It’s the worst outage he has seen in his 31 years at Nolin, he said.

  • Winter storm looms

    By JOHN FRIEDLEIN

    jfriedlein@thenewsenterprise.com

    HARDIN COUNTY — What is shaping up to be the biggest winter storm of the season is expected to blanket the area with several inches of snow today.

    The system could bring 3-5 inches of wintry precipitation, with ice farther south and heavier snowfall to the north, said Mark Adams, lead forecaster for the Fort Knox weather station.

    Before today, the deepest snow of the season was 2 inches on Jan. 19.

  • The circus is coming to town

    By BECCA OWSLEY bowsley@thenewsenterprise.com ELIZABETHTOWNDancing dogs, trapeze acts and clowns are making their way to Elizabethtown. Hailing from Sarasota, Fla., the Walker Bros.

  • Lincoln wedding memorial on tap

    By JOHN FRIEDLEIN

    jfriedlein@thenewsenterprise.com

    ELIZABETHTOWN — Further strengthening this area’s Abraham Lincoln ties, a local office supply and design store soon will give up a parking space for a memorial to the wedding of his dad and step-mom.

    Thomas Lincoln married Sarah Bush Johnston at the Main Street site, now occupied by Kerr Office Group.

  • Boil water advisory set

    STAFF REPORT

    Hardin County Judge-Executive Harry Berry said large generators were being shipped in to Hardin County Water District No. 1 and Hardin County Water District No.2 on Wednesday and should be in place and functioning by this morning.

    He said the generators would not bring the plants back to normal energy capacity, but would be a great help as energy providers work to get power back online. In the meantime, he said people should be mindful of how much water they use, and avoid long showers or baths.

  • Breaking News

    By JEFF D'ALESSIO

    jdalessio@thenewenterprise.com

    HARDIN COUNTY - Winter wrapped a strong grip around Hardin County Tuesday night and into today, downing power lines, snapping trees and leaving thousands of residents without power and sending many others to emergency shelters.

    A heavy load of freezing rain downed trees and power lines around the county Tuesday afternoon and evening.

    Kentucky Utilities estimated about 125,000 residents around the state were left without power. Nolin RECC also faced heavy power outages.

  • 1-28 Services

     

  • Jan. 27, 2009: Our readers write

    Propagandists run amok

    Two researchers, Gary A. Tobin and Dennis R. Ybarra, performed a study that has since been published as “The Trouble with Textbooks: Distorting History and Religion.” The five-year effort looked at 28 prominent history, geography and social studies textbooks finding American public school students are being loaded up with indoctrination about Christianity, Judaism, Islam and the Middle East, to the cost of Christianity and Judaism and the benefit of Islam. Some of the claims are:

  • Rights complaints high, substantiations not

    By BOB WHITE

    bwhite@thenewsenterprise.com

    LOUISVILLE – For a second consecutive year, Kentucky’s Commission on Human Rights received more than 420 complaints in 2008, but only a small percentage of complaints are substantiated or withdrawn after settlement, records show.