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Columns

  • Visit to Israel clarifies 'promise' in Kentucky

    Over the last couple of weeks, I had the opportunity to visit a region of the world that is a constant source of international news. In my spare time, I volunteer with Lamb & Lion Ministries. I speak as needed and am the designated leader for Pilgrimage trips to Israel. During our visit, the Middle East was once again in the headlines.

  • Lesson about the power and importance of a hug

    She sits among several of her fellow residents at the long-term care facility I visit, ensconced in her whee chair, sometimes napping, sometimes staring. I suppose I’ve walked past her dozens of times, greeting her with a casual “Hello” or “How are you?” I can’t say I’ve taken the time to wait for a response. I’ve felt her tired eyes following me as I’ve quickly disappeared around the corner and down the hallway.

    But this day, she stopped me cold in my tracks.

  • Some scams appear at your front door

    In the summer months, scammers take advantage of the good weather to stalk neighborhoods. Going door-to-door with different scams to steal personal information and money.

    Some sales people may be trustworthy, working for legitimate companies or are “one-man-bands” selling their services for honest summer maintenance work. But there also are scammers out there “posing” as honest sales people.

  • Sorting out what’s important on the porch out back

    At my house, there’s a back porch.

    Actually, you probably would call it a covered patio. Because I like to think of myself as a Southerner, it’s a porch to me.

    The neat slabs of concrete made from creek rocks have been behind the house since well before we moved in about eight years ago. It’s nothing new but I “discovered” it again last Wednesday night.

    Sometime around 10, the Schnauzer that shares our home wanted to visit the backyard. For some reason, I decided to walk out as well.

  • What our country needs from the news media

    These days, the scandal involving long wait times at VA hospitals can feel like some made-in-Washington spectacle generated by politicians looking for headlines. But it isn’t.

  • Encountering nice people along the road

    Granddad Whitlock, whom we affectionately called Pappy, liked to say the people in Texas were among the friendliest folks on earth. Pappy was born in Texas, in the tiny town of Osage. Although he spent most of his adult years in Oklahoma, he always was proud to be a native Texan.

  • New roads provide new perspective about our travel

    In the 12 years since my mother’s death, I’ve probably driven by the old home place less than a dozen times.

    For a while, it seemed necessary to avoid that stretch of Ky. 1500 between Vine Grove and Fort Knox. But time eases the pain and warm memories eventually won out over grief and loneliness.

    On Memorial Day, a trip along the route felt appropriate. It also would provide a look at the new access road leading to Bullion Boulevard at Fort Knox.

    So turning off Joe Prather Highway, I headed to see what had changed.

  • Some folks got mad about what we didn't do

    Sometimes it’s valuable to take down the wall and give our readers a peak at the thought process that goes into your daily newspaper.

    Maybe you’ll still disagree, but at least it will be an informed opinion.

    Every election season is accompanied by a certain amount of stress at the newspaper. With the energy and urgency invested by candidates and their supporters, it’s no surprise that some will lose perspective.

    Occasionally, I think, there’s just a need to blame someone other than themselves.

  • Understanding paradox is key to enjoying paradise

    Christianity is a religion of paradox because without faith, there is no true Christianity. Think about it: A paradox is defined as “a statement that seems contradictory, unbelievable, or absurd but that may be true in fact.”

    Christians are a people of paradox because they believe to be true what appears in the natural to be unbelievable or absurd.

  • A lesson about photography, parenting and priorities

    As a longtime photographer, I am well aware of missed opportunities.

    I have missed many good photos because I decided I would get to it later. In springtime, it might be a dogwood blooming along a rustic fence line that I drive by and think, “I’ll stop tomorrow, the light will be better.” In the winter, it could be an old tobacco barn covered in newly fallen snow, serene and isolated in the cold beauty of its surroundings.