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Columns

  • Retail Federation challenges proposed 1 percent local tax

    The Kentucky House of Representatives is considering HB 399 to allow local governments to impose up to a 1 percent local sales tax. The Kentucky Retail Federation has serious concerns about the proposal’s impact on Kentucky’s businesses and consumers as well as the commonwealth itself.

  • Right-to-work laws actually can benefit labor unions

    Labor-union workers wearing ugly green T-shirts verbally accosted me at the end of last week’s news conference in the Capitol Annex promoting a right-to-work policy for Kentucky – something employees in 24 other states enjoy.

  • Trucking advocate offers views on heavier loads

    Recently, an article was presented here from a concerned group discussing why Senate Bill 44 should not become law. Senate Bill 44 would allow trucks hauling poultry, livestock and agricultural products to travel on all state and local roads up to 8,000 additional pounds. The topic of heavier trucks is a discussion worth having and one that is taking place on the national level as well as the state level. 

  • Heavier trucks increase hazard on highways

    The Kentucky Senate passed a bill Feb. 4 that would allow heavier semi-trailer trucks hauling poultry, livestock and agricultural products to travel on all state and local roads, raising the maximum weight from 80,000 pounds to 88,000 pounds. The bill now heads to the Kentucky House, where supporters are making an all-out effort to pass the legislation.

  • What’s missing in health care is dose of competition

    When Super Bowl ads featuring hybrid dogs and half-naked celebrities hype the affordability of $49 X-rays and the convenience of 24/7 angioplasty clinics, we'll know we’re on the way to conquering spiraling health care costs.

    We live in a free-market nation. Competition forces companies to extol their advantages with frequency and volume.

    Five-dollar Footlong, anyone? Two-for-one pizza? Or a car that’s way better (cheaper, more reliable, better mileage) than that seemingly similar other make of car?

  • Abusing Kosair’s name

    The Better Business Bureau warns local residents to beware of scammers who are using Kosair Charities’ good name.

    A local resident received a call from someone claiming to be with the Firefighter’s Union, who said he was selling decals and seals for the Kosair Charities burn unit.

    There are several things wrong with this phone call:

  • It's hard to fathom the county that greeted HMH

    The fact that the local hospital’s anniversary coincides with Valentine’s Day seems quite appropriate to those of us born inside its walls over the past six decades.

    Most of us came to be because of an expression of our parents’ affection and love.

    I was born there. My wife was born there. Both our daughters too. That alone makes Hardin Memorial a rich part of our family heritage.

    But what was it like when Hardin Memorial was born?

  • Balancing liberty with security is modern challenge

    Every few days, we learn yet one more way in which government’s expanded surveillance powers intrude upon our privacy and civil liberties.

  • How the world measures vice has flipped

    Most people would see Kentuckians as God-fearing members of America’s conservative Bible belt. But when you consider the state’s “signature industries” — bourbon, burley and betting — are associated with vice, I have to wonder.

    Today’s Kentucky looks upon these matters quite differently than the Kentucky of my youth. Never could I have suspected that of the three vices, smoking would be considered the most vile.

  • Encourage legislators to act on behalf of abused kids

    If Kentucky’s lawmakers don’t act soon, children in our community and across the Commonwealth will lose out on $9.2 million in matching federal dollars to care for victims of child abuse and neglect. We simply cannot afford to let that happen. The need is too great.

    Kentucky’s lawmakers must take action now to make the more than 7,000 neglected, abused and battered children across our state a priority. Children who have been placed in the state’s custody because of parental abuse and neglect need our support now.