.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Beginning Tuesday, a weekly feature focusing on local teens

    Looking for a way to establish something new, an obviously successful model is a good place to start.

    That’s the reasoning behind the format and look of a new weekly feature that debuts Tuesday in The News-Enterprise.

    In search of a regular method to recognize the achievements of young people, the newspaper’s features team launches Tuesday’s Teen. It’s being established based on two effective examples.

  • Squawking about pension reform doesn’t make it so

    Recently, I was a panelist on KET’s “Kentucky Tonight” program about the commonwealth’s public-pension crisis.

    Much of the discussion reminded me of an annoying rhetorical tactic generally reserved for parrots, but often employed by cheerleaders for bigger, more -costly government: repeating the same nonsense over and over until viewers cave to the pure monotony.

  • Destructive storms are just the nature of this world

    I grew up in Tornado Alley. Tornadoes were more of an event I enjoyed than a threat I feared, so invincible did I think I was as a child and teenager. As we gathered in the Shively’s storm shelter with other neighbors, I rather enjoyed the social gathering and naively hoped the twister somehow would be bad enough to cancel school but not destructive enough to hurt anyone.

    Questions of why, an inevitable response to suffering, weren’t in my purview, at least not then.

  • Revolving Republicans

    Some 25 years ago, I changed my life.

    A visit inside a church opened my eyes to the destructive life I was living, financed by welfare checks generously provided by American taxpayers.

    I got off welfare, went to work, got politically active and became a Republican. I didn’t become a Republican because of what the party looked like. I became a Republican because of what the party stood for: individual freedom, traditional values, with a view that government’s role is to protect our freedom at home and abroad.

  • A sober approach to drunken driving

    In its new report on how to reduce drunken-driving deaths, the National Transportation Safety Board states its goal in the title: “Reaching Zero.” The agency thinks it is irreproachable to try to ensure that no one ever dies in an alcohol-related accident. In fact, it’s a utopian goal requiring excessive compulsion in the pursuit of unattainable perfection.

  • Brass tacks about square feet

    Late last year, ICON Engineering & Inspection Services performed a “new facility programming study” for Hardin County government. It is common practice to perform such a study prior to designing a large construction project.

  • How I became a tree hugger

    “What are you doing, Dad?” my son asked when he called me on his cell phone.

    I was sitting on our back patio, admiring the work I’d done, having just planted the first third of my garden with the non-genetically modified seeds I had oh-so carefully selected. I wanted to come as close as I could to having an organic garden.

    Then just as I as I leaned back to relax, I stood up straight, squinting at the tractor spraying the field behind my house. It was coming closer and closer to my garden.

  • Drawing insight from a coach's childhood story

    A couple weeks ago, I had never heard of Ken Lolla. Since his speech at the Select Preps banquet nine days ago, his words keep bouncing around in my head.

    Lolla is the men’s soccer coach for the University of Louisville. He’s also a father of three, a motivational speaker, the author of a children’s book and is developing into a brand name. He shares his ideas from www.kenlolla.com and has active social media accounts.

  • 'Invisible lawmakers' dramatically impact final regulations

    By Lee Hamilton

    Want to know what’s causing a lot of people in Washington to work long hours right now? Here’s a hint: It’s not immigration reform or gun control or, for that matter, any other legislation coming down the pike. Instead, it’s a pair of 3-year-old laws.

  • Neighborly ways don't include bulldozer traffic

    Will there be fences in heaven?

    That’s another way of asking, will your bothersome neighbor’s heavenly mansion be next to yours?

    Before you petition heaven’s city council for a privacy fence or request that your bad neighbor be confined to the eternal promised land’s back forty, make sure you yourself aren’t unwittingly the neighbor from hell who somehow slipped under the pearly gates unnoticed while St. Peter was distracted by a game of heavenly baseball.