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Columns

  • A messy hillside stirs memories of warmth

    Draped in black, the hillside behind the backyards of Red Hawk Drive homes showed the impact of an overnight train derailment.

    Tons of coal poured from derailed hoppers. A stand of trees alongside the track appeared to be propping up the silver train cars, keeping them from rolling down the hill.

    The scattered shipment covered the earth, mashing small plants and smothering the soil. It’s odd how memories work. Because at first glance, the mess reminded me of Grandpa.

  • Better Business Bureau: Shop smart, spend less on back to school

    With school bells ringing, now is the time to take advantage of annual back-to-school specials on supplies. Whether you plan to shop at your favorite retail store or in the drawers and closets of your home, Better Business Bureau recommends sticking to a budget to avoid the common overspending on school supplies.

  • A voice from the darkness makes a simple request

    Driving on an unfamiliar stretch of interstate outside an unfamiliar Ohio city, a decision was made to steer off onto a dimly lit street.

    It was just before midnight about a week ago. The immediate destination was the familiar yellow-and-black Waffle House sign glowing near the exit. Nothing else seemed to be open at that hour.

    Pulling into the parking lot, it seemed important to park near the entrance and the light escaping from the restaurant windows. I remember looking for a perfect spot, not too close to someone else’s car that might be bumped.

  • Two Views: Proposal will introduce underground hazards

    By LARA BEARD

    Something wicked this way comes to Hardin County. Represented by a firm that employs our governor’s son and cloaked with smiles and promises, the Bluegrass Pipeline is ready to ooze dark miasma into our beloved Hardin County ground, water and air. It is recommended by people who have no allegiance to place, or reason for being here, but to profit themselves and their shareholders.

  • Two Views: Pipeline can be an important to Kentucky’s economic future

    By JAMES SCHEEL
    and ALLEN KIRKLEY

    Learning that a new underground pipeline may be coming through Kentucky has some folks asking questions. What are the risks? What about my land? What about the environmental impact? These are just a few things Kentuckians have a right to know about the proposed Bluegrass Pipeline Project.

  • Better Business Bureau: Latest scam alerts released
    • Medical alert system scam: Local seniors are annoyed over automated calls from “John” saying someone has paid for a Free Medical Alert System for them. The calls are making the rounds locally. “John” just needs your personal information to ship the system. Don’t give your personal information to someone you do not know.
  • Discarding a symbol of personal growth

    Cleaning the shed was long overdue.

    It’s quite obvious I do not suffer from an excessive compulsive nature. Organization for me is a stack on the desk, a cluttered box of mementos hidden in the closet or a pile of forgotten items on a shelf.

    I blame it on creativity. While you are organizing your papers and arranging your video collection alphabetically by title in a subset divided by genre, I am stuck in the other side of my brain.

    (One blessing of creativity is the ability to rationalize my shortcomings.)

  • Things I learned from my father-in-law

    They let her know he wasn’t her “real” dad when she was a little girl.

    It stung, at least for a while.

    “I always thought I was my daddy’s ‘real’ little girl. I guess I was afraid that might change.”

    But it didn’t. Not even for a moment.

  • In pursuit of fame, second chances are hard to come by

    Talent often is not enough.

    Coupled with hard work and determination, talent may take flight. But often in this complex, unfair world that combination still falls short.

    You also need good fortune and opportunity. And if you get one chance at success or fame, you better make the most of it.

    Second chances are even more rare.

    Marty Brown is pursuing his second chance.

  • Assault on economic sensibility

    “Nobody spends somebody else’s money as carefully as he spends his own,” was the pearl of wisdom I recently borrowed from the late Nobel prize-winning economist Milton Friedman.

    Though I originally used the quote in reference to the Kentucky State Fair Board’s willingness to forgive debt obligations from the Louisville Arena Authority worth millions of taxpayer dollars, the principle applies in many other “arenas” (sorry) as well, including Kentucky’s public-pension system.