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Columns

  • Sunshine week: Media and public both have roles in oversight

    The caller on the other end of the phone line was near exasperation. He had been given the run-around by government officials, the very people he put in office to represent him, and his quest for answers was met time and again with roadblocks.

    I don’t recall the specifics of the man’s concern, or the public officials he was trying to spur to action in a cause he passionately believed in from the conversation years ago. But one thing he said has stuck with me, and it is something I go back to time and again whenever someone calls with similar concerns.

  • Community should create a business incubator locally

    Nearly every Elizabethtown historian can tell you how Samuel Haycraft Jr., son of the town’s founder, wrote in 1869, “For who can tell what Elizabethtown will be, with her delightful location, her enterprising and energetic population … her future manufactories that must spring up … when it becomes a large city it will be well to look back upon her starting point.”

    Here we are, almost 150 years later, and in some ways that future still awaits.

  • What an age: News updates are as close as the nearest telephone

     

    ife changes seemingly occur at light speed in this technologically accelerated world.

    Many of the extraordinary wonders of my childhood science-fiction favorites have jumped off the bookshelves and exist today in my own house. Sometimes the changes are hard to fathom.

  • Time for transparency in Frankfort

    Every year members of the Kentucky General Assembly descend on Frankfort to carry out the duties our residents expect us to do. That expectation includes making sure the legislative process is open and transparent to all Kentuckians.

    But time and time again, and to the frustration of many of us in the Kentucky House of Representatives, the legislative process seems in some cases to be stuck in the back rooms of the Capitol. Never has that been clearer than our efforts to address one of the major issues of the 2013 Session: reforming our public pension system.

  • KMA president takes issue with state Medicaid

    Pop singer Prince had a hit song more than 20 years ago that said we should all “party like it’s 1999.” Unfortunately, the managed care organizations running the Kentucky Medicaid system are following the song’s advice and operating in the managed care world of 1999.

  • Plunging into the surprising sinkholes of life

    Even though your house may appear to rest on solid ground, there is still the possibility you may find yourself suddenly awakened in the middle of the night by the rumble of your bedroom floor opening into a massive hole, sliding you and the contents of the room into its pit, interrupting your sweet dreams with dirt and debris.

  • The lights are much brighter elsewhere

    Maybe it’s time to redefine.

    The Heritage Council is working diligently to resurrect Elizabethtown’s historic core. Behind fresh ideas from Heath Seymour plus support and money from city government, things are looking up around the Public Square.

  • Searching for a cure for loneliness

    “I’ve been lonely for quite some time now. It hangs over me like a black cloud and follows me wherever I go. At times I can escape it, but it seems like it always waiting there…”

    I’d heard similar confessions before from others. I’ve heard it from my own voice within, at times, too.

    People get lonely. Some studies list loneliness as the most common anxiety of people today. Some estimate as many as 50 percent of the population experiences chronic loneliness.

    Someone you know is lonely.

  • Beasley family knows value of education and ECTC

    By JOYCE BEASLEY
    Guest columnist

    My mom determined that all of my brothers and sisters would attend college or some other form of higher learning after high school. I could hear the finality in my Mom’s voice that high school was not our last stop in the educational world.

  • Reasons to laugh in a season of sadness

    Most of us know what it’s like to laugh at the wrong time.

    The character Ray Barone in the sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond” got himself in a peck of trouble when his wife Debra confided in him that her parents were getting a divorce. Typical of Raymond, instead of being empathic, he found the situation laughable and couldn’t restrain his snicker.

    Debra made him pay severely for his faux pas.