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Columns

  • Derby activities belong to all Kentuckians

    It begins with Thunder Over Louisville and the events keep on coming, right up to the first Saturday each May.

    The mini-marathon, the Great Balloon Race and Fest-a-Ville on the Waterfront all have developed followings of their own. Smaller crowds participate in everything from volleyball games to a poker tournament as the Kentucky Derby Festival’s excitement begins.

    When Derby Week eventually arrives the Great Steamboat Race occurs on Wednesday afternoon and the Pegasus Parade on Thursday.

  • How politics has changed

    When two senators recently got into a spat over whether the Boston Marathon bombings were being politicized, the news was everywhere within minutes. Reams of commentary quickly followed.

    In the maneuvering over gun-control legislation, every twist and turn was reported instantly and then endlessly debated.

    As the effects of the federal sequester start to make themselves felt, outlets in every medium — print, television, online — are carrying both the news and the inevitable partisan sniping over its meaning.

  • A few clicks online can put a smile on Mackenzie’s face

     

    Three years ago, I was at an airport waiting for a flight home on a beautiful November day.

    Minding my own business concentrating on the book I was reading, suddenly out of the corner of my eye, lights flashed. I looked over to see a smiling seemingly healthy little girl, the flashing lights were the lights on her wheelchair.

  • Crazy or just hootchie cootchie googooing?

    Standing at the end of the aisle in the department store, I heard loud noises from someone coming closer. “Woo who, boo boo, waahhh waahhh.”

    The weird sounds were coming from a lady walking down the aisle. And the closer she got to me, the louder her babbling became. She looked to be 60 something and the younger woman following close behind her I assumed to be the older lady’s 20-something daughter.

  • Taking the temperature of our civic health

    Mental health, dental health, financial health all are familiar phrases. Frequently, I run across stories particularly geared to men's health, women's health or kids' health. At the grocery store, there's a whole section devoted to health and beauty aids. And at my age, I hear a lot about prostate health.

    But until recently, I never had encountered the concept of measuring "civic health."

  • Life’s painful rubbish can be transformed with care, mercy

     

    “It just doesn’t make sense” is the generalized response from those familiar with the Tsarnaev brothers. They seemed like the kind of young men you might like as neighbors: kind, quite, unobtrusive.

    These two alleged perpetrators of the Boston bombings? It just doesn’t make sense.

    Or does it?

  • Social media makes for all kinds of 'kings-of-the-hill'

    For many reasons, Facebook seems to make the world a little smaller.

    Without leaving the house, I can poke around for updates on my circle of friends in Bowling Green. I can hear about the highlights on my daughters’ lives and their families in Lexington and Pensacola, Fla. I even can collect news updates from the Duck Dynasty characters while following the headlines of this very newspaper.

    Checking in with Facebook can be fun. But it also can be kind of weird.

  • Doctor challenges county's expenditures regarding HMH

    After World War II the U.S. Congress passed a bill known as “Hillburton,” which provided funds to be used to build rural hospitals. This ignited the idea of a hospital in Elizabethtown. The project was first taken by the Elizabethtown Rotary Club in 1949. This was brought to a vote, the idea was rejected.

    A couple of years later, a wiser Rotary Club asked the Lions Club for assistance. The Rotary and Lions Clubs again put the question to a vote. This time the issue passed, and Hardin Memorial Hospital became a reality.

  • Faith provides the strength exhibited in '42'

    The evils of racism are expressed in the words we speak and the mores we establish. And both emerge from the illusion of superiority.

    Jackie Robinson, as a black American, was thrown into the fire when he entered major league baseball in 1947, breaking the sport’s color barrier. The movie, “42,” named after Robinson’s jersey number, depicts the dramatic events of that year.

  • Develop financial literacy

    April is Financial Literacy Month and with help from FINRA, BBB is sharing ways in which you can become financially literate. One of the first steps to financial happiness is getting out of debt.

    It’s easy to fall into debt. But just because you’re in debt, doesn’t mean you have to stay in debt. Whether you’re in serious trouble or just want to pay down some bills, take the steps in this financial action plan to get going.