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Columns

  • Reinvigorating political parties could snap D.C. impasse

    A few weeks ago, the Republican National Committee issued a 100-page report aimed at reviving the GOP after its poor showing in last November’s elections. It was remarkably blunt about the specifics of the party’s shortcomings — its lack of inclusiveness, its hapless data initiatives, its poor grassroots organizing.

    What it did not take on, however, was an issue the RNC can do little about: the diminished influence, if not irrelevance, of both major parties in American politics.

  • Fiscal Court's second vote affirms first principles

    Hardin Fiscal Court plans a classic do-over.

    In self-officiated playground games of our youth, conflicts often were discarded with a shout of “do-over” and the disputed play would be tossed out. Play resumed as if it never happened.

  • Cool weather may challenge weed control in wheat

    As we progress through thiscooler-than-normal spring, wheat growers quickly are being faced with weed management decisions.

    This spring, the million-dollar question has been, “Will my herbicides work in these cool temperatures?” Some growers have delayed herbicide applications in hope of better weather in coming days.

  • Vegan diet sidetracked by intoxicating steak

    “You’ve got to be kidding me.” That was my wife’s response when I told her I was going on a vegan diet plan, which is a vegetarian diet that excludes meat, dairy products and eggs.

    My son, Dave, was more blunt: “You might as well turn in your man card, Dad.

    It happened like this. One of my friends, who is an avid runner, mentioned that she has trouble getting adequate protein in her diet. “I’ve never had trouble eating animals that are raised and killed for food,” I commented.

  • At tax time, consider donations to charitable organizations

    I often tell people that if it doesn’t bother your conscience or your pocketbook you’re probably not going to change. 

    When it comes to giving to a charity it is definitely true but if you ask the right questions of your tax professional you may get a little more out of your tax deductions to go along with your generosity. If you are already giving to a nonprofit, now might be a good time to ask about the benefits of managing your successful investments as part of a charitable giving plan.    

  • Easter is about an empty tomb, not empty plastic eggs

    When it comes to Easter eggs, my preference is artificial and hollow.

  • Observing the interactions of two popes

    Some predicted the meeting between newly elected Pope Francis and his predecessor, Benedict XVI, would be awkward. After all, the Roman Catholic Church hasn’t had a pope resign in 600 years.

    What would the two men say to each other? Would Benedict tell Pope Francis what he should and shouldn’t be doing? Would the former pope be looking over the new pope’s shoulder? And would the new pope feel threatened, even resentful?

    Would people find themselves torn between two popes?

  • Judge-executive reviews decision about county government building

    Last month, Hardin Fiscal Court voted by an 8-1 margin to proceed with designing new county government facilities on county-owned property near the intersection of Rineyville Road and Ring Road. This is a decision contemplated, researched and developed over six years.

    As with any issue, there are strong opinions supporting and opposing this decision. Those viewpoints were expressed by countless individuals on numerous occasions over a six-year period.

  • Kentucky retailers want to erase taxation disadvantage

    Kentucky retailers aren’t looking for a handout from Washington. They just want a sale made from a smartphone in Henderson or a laptop in Pikeville to be treated the same way as a purchase made at a store in Danville or Frankfort.

    Before that can happen, Congress must pass the Marketplace Fairness Act of 2013. The federal legislation would give states the authority to require that out-of-state merchants collect and remit state sales taxes.

  • Regulators steer vans, trucks in the wrong direction

    When it comes to barbershops, moving companies and food vendor trucks, Kentucky regulators have a curious penchant for shielding established businesses from fresh competition.

    A recent Institute for Justice study concludes the Bluegrass State has the 15th most burdensome licensing laws in America.