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Columns

  • Thankfulness, contentment buried beneath lottery dreams

    Less than a week after counting our blessings across the table from loved ones during a Thanksgiving feast, the $550 million Powerball jackpot created days filled with daydreams. It provided an interesting contrast.

    Instead of focusing on what we have and hold, many conversations last week were punctuated with speculative spending plans for the multi-million promise that seemed just $2 away from reach.

  • ‘Cliff’ not steep enough to sway some conservatives

    Former Lexington radio talk-show host Leland Conway once asked his listeners to send pork rinds to Washington after some liberals in Congress claimed the American people didn’t care about wasteful spending amendments.

  • Living in the rut of holiday expectations

    I’m not the easiest person to be around at the holidays. There’s a bit of Scrooge in me.

    Perhaps I’m just too comfortable in my well-defined, predictable schedule that some might consider a rut.

    It hasn’t always been that way. Childhood holidays were times of wonderment and anticipation coupled with the carefree schedule of school holiday vacations.

  • A bipartisan goal: Quality constituent service

    The rigors of the campaign are still fresh, but for newly elected House members and senators, the hard part is just beginning. Already, they’re inundated with advice on the issues they’ll be facing: the fiscal cliff, crises overseas, how to behave in a highly partisan Congress.

    All of this will take time to sort out. But there’s one task I’d advise them to tackle right away, whatever their party: Learning how to do constituent services right.

  • Make giving a planned family activity

    The end of the year is a special time to gather with family, reunite with friends and remember the many blessings of the prior months. It also is a time for the more than 400 nonprofits in Hardin County to request your help in volunteering and fundraising.

  • Thanksgiving's future: Will we choose bargains over traditions?

    My, oh my, no time for sweet potato pie this Thanksgiving. We’ve got to rush out and catch the sales at Walmart and Sears by 8 p.m., Target by 9 p.m., then Kohl’s and Best Buy at midnight.

    And oh yes, thank you Kmart for that breather between 4 and 8 p.m., Thanksgiving Day, giving us just enough time to scarf down the turkey and dressing before full-throttling ahead on our shopping tour until 11 p.m. Friday.

    The inevitable has happened: Black Friday has invaded Turkey Thursday.

  • Violating our freedoms is no small thing

    During this Thanksgiving season, I trust you can find it in your heart to forgive me for writing about politics. But I have some unfinished business related to the most recent election.

    It seems every election season, the newspaper fields calls about destruction, damage or theft of political signs. This year was no exception. The local Republican Party, in fact, offered a bounty for information leading to the arrest of a serial sign vandal.

  • Are you an anonymous grace-giver? Join the club

    I’m thinking about starting a non-profit organization for all the people who perform acts of kindness and don’t want to be thanked for doing them.

    Maybe I’ll name it, “Grace-Givers Anonymous.” I could set up a website where people like you could donate. Billboards promoting deliberate acts of kindness could be set up. Together we could run TV commercials for the cause.

  • The future changes forever this afternoon at 2

    For many communities, honoring veterans is a once a year activity. Not so here.

    Credit the close association with Fort Knox, our general appreciation for God and country or the Kentucky work ethic that respects service above all. Whatever the reason, displaying respect for veterans is not a once a year Veterans Day experience in Hardin County.

  • Parting with a reliable, if a bit rusty, old friend

    This year between 30 and 40 million Americans will sell a used car. I’m one of them. I just parted with my old car.

    I bought the 1996 T-Bird mainly out of desperation; Lori and I had grown weary of car-pooling in our one vehicle. She would need to go home when I had the car somewhere else; I had to have it when she was on an errand.

    We felt like the frustrated cab driver who is supposed to take two passengers in different directions at the same time.