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Columns

  • This campaign should be about informing voters

    Voters want a forthright, give-it-to-me-straight campaign that doesn’t sugarcoat hard truths but that also generates new thinking about how to solve our problems.

    Presidential candidates and their aides know a lot these days about how to run a campaign. They just seem to have forgotten what campaigns are for.

  • Speaking with one voice, community says no to unity

    In the world of science, a pair of researchers recently developed a paper describing how people can tune in to a single speaker and distinguish the conversation in a crowded, noisy room. Their April paper in the journal Nature described it as “selective hearing.”

    That phrase means something very different in my household. I believe when my wife uses it she refers to my tendency to ignore something I don’t want to hear ... or at least a perceived tendency.

  • A better response to drug abuse

    Politicians in Frankfort who still believe government edicts can somehow or other deliver the commonwealth from the scourge of prescription drug abuse are once again approaching the issue with a butcher knife instead of a scalpel.

  • Dangerous fuel for rumor mill

    In the workplace, it surreptitiously moves under the guise of “networking.” In the church, it can be elevated to the status of “prayer requests.” But when brought to a court of law, it is usually called “defamation of character.”   

    It can be dangerous and destructive. Written or spoken words intended to harm or hurt others can have serious implications, especially when those words are communicated in the public domain.

  • Tips to reduce stress of finding a home loan

    With interest rates at historic lows and home prices not back to pre-recession values, Many people are looking at buying their first home, buying bigger homes or refinancing mortgages.

  • The issue is free speech and respect, not chicken

    Who would have thought buying a chicken sandwich with a pickle on it could become a political statement?

    Two weeks ago, the political donations and faith-based beliefs of the 91-year-old founder of Chick-fil-A were of little concern. In the past week, it has dominated social media and newspaper front pages and altered the dining habits of thousands ... at least for a day.

    I have to admit I know absolutely nothing about the political posture of Zaxby’s ownership. I do know I love their chicken fingers.

  • Budget cuts hollow out court system

    As chief justice, I find it disheartening that I can no longer assure you that the courts in Kentucky will be open when you need them.

    For the first time in modern history, we will have to close every courthouse in the state to balance the Judicial Branch budget. For three days in 2012, we must furlough all court personnel and close all doors because the General Assembly has not allotted enough money to fund court operations at current levels.

  • Steps for processing stress

    I was working my way through a row of tomatoes, picking what I could while pulling weeds at the same time.

    Lori was shoulder high in okra, quickly filling one bucket and exchanging it for an empty one.

    Tossing weeds to the side, emptying another bucket of tomatoes, eyeing the rows of ripe peppers, I said to Lori, “I’m overwhelmed. I’ve gotten behind and I don’t see how we can catch up.”

  • BBB’s tips on giving online education programs the third degree before signing up

    Better Business Bureau is warning prospective students to be wary of certain online schools and education opportunities.

    According to the 2010 Sloan Survey of Online Learning, with nearly 6.5 million people involved in some form of online learning, it is more important than ever to take precautions to ensure time, energy and money aren’t wasted.

    The popularity of distance degrees and similar programs has led to more diploma mills, unaccredited universities, and shady institutions that take advantage of unassuming students.

  • Opening the blinds on pension secrecy

    Kentucky’s pension debt, which stands at nearly $34 billion today, is expected to reach $40 billion by 2015.

    How different would our situation be today if former Gov. Wendell Ford had not decided in 1972 that taxpayers don’t have a right to know who receives their hard-earned dollars in the form of pensions, or even how many pensions some state retirees get?