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Columns

  • Parting with a reliable, if a bit rusty, old friend

    This year between 30 and 40 million Americans will sell a used car. I’m one of them. I just parted with my old car.

    I bought the 1996 T-Bird mainly out of desperation; Lori and I had grown weary of car-pooling in our one vehicle. She would need to go home when I had the car somewhere else; I had to have it when she was on an errand.

    We felt like the frustrated cab driver who is supposed to take two passengers in different directions at the same time.

  • If FEMA vanished, Americans would adjust

    dvocates of big government never miss a chance to capitalize on a natural disaster. Even before the storm has passed, they will boast that without activist government, recovery would be impossible. Peddlers of this line ask us to imagine what life would be like today — in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy — without FEMA and the state and local emergency agencies. This, they say, is the condition to which opponents of big government would reduce the country.

    But they lack imagination.

  • Thrust headlong into an imaginative adventure

     

    It began as a serene fall experience. Leaves crunching under foot on a cool afternoon as I walked along a country fence row with my infant grandson tucked against my side.

    Suddenly as if from nowhere, a deer appears. It breaks into a dead run. The movement was surprising but not alarming until I realized it’s charging me.

    The deer’s head crashes into my side waist high just below the ribs. As I bend with the blow, the child flies free of my grasp.

  • Study the candidates and express yourself at the polls

    Americans once again will exercise one of their most important rights and responsibilities. Millions will cast votes to decide who will serve in elected offices at every national, state and local level.

    Sadly, over the years fewer and fewer Americans have actively participated in this most American of duties. Many election outcomes are determined by far less than half the eligible voters. 

  • Every vote has an impact and every voter matters

    With every flyer I placed on the doorknob, I felt a surge of energy. I was actually making a difference and for an 11-year-old kid, that’s a big deal.

  • Nothing good ever develops from anger

    Some stereotypes are grossly unfair and not very flattering. That said, when the shoe fits, wear it, and as an Italian American, I fit the stereotype of being emotional (I know) and passionate (I think). Cest la vie.

    But I realized today that in that gamut of emotions there is one I regret.

    Anger.

    I wish I hadn’t wasted so much emotional energy when I was younger in being angry.

  • Time to unmask David Williams

    It’s the Halloween season, which has morphed beyond its trick-or-treat candy collection roots into a leading celebration for people otherwise known as grownups.

    For many, it’s a time to display their creativity in the form of a costume or alternate personality. It will be displayed in some business offices Wednesday and in countless home parties that evening.

    When you realize that many of us disguise our true nature each day behind socially acceptable personality masks, it’s easy to understand the attraction of these Halloween fantasies.

  • Editorial board to offer recommendations in two city races

    A fter investing more than 12 hours in interviews, research and debate, The News-Enterprise’s editorial board will seek to provide some pre-election insight for local residents later this week.

    On Thursday, recommendations for Radcliff City Council will be published, followed in Friday’s editions by a similar editorial regarding Elizabethtown City Council.

  • Remembering Pat Owsley

    By: MATT ADAMS

    In roughly two years of working for the Hardin County Extension Service, I have written about many things in this column. From drought, to insects, to disease, to flood, one would think I have just about covered it all by now.

    But there is one of the most important aspects of Hardin County agriculture I have not written about, and that is people. The farmers, agribusiness men and women, teachers and community leaders involved in agriculture make this industry what it is in our county.

  • Our rooms are a storehouse of memories

    “I went back upstairs one more time and said ‘goodbye’ to my room. I’m ready to go now.”

    Dave’s words were my signal: Cutting my eyes toward him as he walked to his car, I turned on the headlights in the early morning dawn, put the

    U-Haul in gear and we all – Dave, Lori, Madi and I – headed south, caravan style.