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Columns

  • Steps for processing stress

    I was working my way through a row of tomatoes, picking what I could while pulling weeds at the same time.

    Lori was shoulder high in okra, quickly filling one bucket and exchanging it for an empty one.

    Tossing weeds to the side, emptying another bucket of tomatoes, eyeing the rows of ripe peppers, I said to Lori, “I’m overwhelmed. I’ve gotten behind and I don’t see how we can catch up.”

  • BBB’s tips on giving online education programs the third degree before signing up

    Better Business Bureau is warning prospective students to be wary of certain online schools and education opportunities.

    According to the 2010 Sloan Survey of Online Learning, with nearly 6.5 million people involved in some form of online learning, it is more important than ever to take precautions to ensure time, energy and money aren’t wasted.

    The popularity of distance degrees and similar programs has led to more diploma mills, unaccredited universities, and shady institutions that take advantage of unassuming students.

  • Opening the blinds on pension secrecy

    Kentucky’s pension debt, which stands at nearly $34 billion today, is expected to reach $40 billion by 2015.

    How different would our situation be today if former Gov. Wendell Ford had not decided in 1972 that taxpayers don’t have a right to know who receives their hard-earned dollars in the form of pensions, or even how many pensions some state retirees get?

  • Counting on crop insurance

    The drought of 2012 couldn’t have come at a worse time. Sure, no one wants to experience a drought, but this drought hit with near record-low carryover stocks for grains, already the smallest cattle supply since the 1950s, and an extremely high number of corn acres planted across the country. So what will save the grain sector of the agriculture industry from complete failure this year? Crop insurance.

  • The unanswered question in Aurora's theater No. 9

    Why?

    It’s the first question I asked and likely the one you first asked too.

    It still echoes from theater No. 9 in the Century 16 Theatre in Aurora, Colo., where 12 people were killed and 58 injured.

    And it’s the one question we never completely will know.

  • Hall-of-Fame lives begin with youthful opportunities

    On consecutive weekends, Elizabethtown has played host to major events that celebrate youthful athletic accomplishments.

    First, the celebration of yesteryear’s achievements featured some premiere basketball players. The Kentucky High School Basketball Hall of Fame conducted its first induction ceremony for 16 of its 100-member centennial class before a packed house at the Historic State Theater.

  • Financial aid schemes target students looking for help

    The Better Business Bureau warns students and parents to be cautious when looking for cash to pay for college.

    With the cost of college outpacing inflation and crimping family budgets, students and their families are eager to find scholarships and other awards to help pay for a higher education.

  • New day for child protection transparency

    Others will no doubt see the big story of today as the state’s appeal to the Supreme Court around the release of child fatalities and near fatalities records. That is important, but let’s face it – that is an old battle being waged to its bitter end.

  • Considering marriage, religion matters

    It’s wedding season. May through August are the most popular months for marriage ceremonies.

    While planning a wedding, depending on the elaborateness of the ceremony and number of guests attending, can involve months of preparation, thriving in a marriage is a lifelong project, filled with challenges. Somebody said in marriage there are three rings:  engagement ring, wedding ring and suffering.

  • Senior Life: Retirement: The golden years?

    Sometimes I like to dream about my retirement. Even though I am several years away, I like to think about it from time to time. Of course, with any luck, I will be able to work for many years to come, but I do allow myself to think to think about the luxury of time. I dream about the places I will visit and the things I will do once I retire.

    For anyone approaching retirement, the excitement could be a hard thing to contain. The reality of retirement may quickly overtake dreams and plans.