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Columns

  • Routine questions, poor listening doom conversations

     

    On day three of her new kindergarten experience, our granddaughter came home and her dad had a question. It’s a common question to ask a school-age kid and apparently a bit too common.

    She responded, “UGH! ARE YOU PEOPLE GOING TO ASK ME THAT EVERY DAY? It was great, OK! Great!

    Impatience apparently runs in the family.

    A lot of us struggle to tolerate the common question. Social pressures require us to smile and politely respond with an inane answer to the ordinary daily questions.

  • Emergency surgery needed on pension liability

    I told the Kentucky Public Pensions Task Force recently that its “patient” is not only very ill, but that its sudden decline should cause a level of angst not unlike that of a doctor whose patient comes to him with a stomach ache and suddenly goes into cardiac arrest.

  • Someone else owns it but memories make it home

    The final chapter of 311 Elmhurst Ave. being the Evans’  home came to a formal end. 

    Someone new now owns the Vine Grove house that was home to all of us since 1966, when my parents signed the closing papers to buy a new home as dad retired from the Army. 

    For more than 40 years, we “kids” and grandkids moved in and moved out, visited, married and divorced, but always had “home” there for comfort.

  • Question should not be the work

    When you work in government or for government, there’s a good chance the spotlight eventually will land on you.

    The people we elect and the people they hire ultimately respond to the whims of voters and taxpayers. It’s difficult to have multiple “bosses,” even when most of the time they don’t pay much attention.

    It also is difficult, I expect, to have reporters looking over your shoulder, asking pesky questions and describing your efforts and accomplishments for all to see.

    But it’s an element of the job.

  • Support must be rallied on behalf of veterans

    Every day our troops stand strong in their pledge to protect the nation, sometimes making the ultimate sacrifice. Yet what are we, the American people, doing to protect and support them?

  • This campaign should be about informing voters

    Voters want a forthright, give-it-to-me-straight campaign that doesn’t sugarcoat hard truths but that also generates new thinking about how to solve our problems.

    Presidential candidates and their aides know a lot these days about how to run a campaign. They just seem to have forgotten what campaigns are for.

  • Speaking with one voice, community says no to unity

    In the world of science, a pair of researchers recently developed a paper describing how people can tune in to a single speaker and distinguish the conversation in a crowded, noisy room. Their April paper in the journal Nature described it as “selective hearing.”

    That phrase means something very different in my household. I believe when my wife uses it she refers to my tendency to ignore something I don’t want to hear ... or at least a perceived tendency.

  • A better response to drug abuse

    Politicians in Frankfort who still believe government edicts can somehow or other deliver the commonwealth from the scourge of prescription drug abuse are once again approaching the issue with a butcher knife instead of a scalpel.

  • Dangerous fuel for rumor mill

    In the workplace, it surreptitiously moves under the guise of “networking.” In the church, it can be elevated to the status of “prayer requests.” But when brought to a court of law, it is usually called “defamation of character.”   

    It can be dangerous and destructive. Written or spoken words intended to harm or hurt others can have serious implications, especially when those words are communicated in the public domain.

  • Tips to reduce stress of finding a home loan

    With interest rates at historic lows and home prices not back to pre-recession values, Many people are looking at buying their first home, buying bigger homes or refinancing mortgages.