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Columns

  • Graduations remind us to focus on the future

    My family recently celebrated a milestone shared by families throughout Hardin County and across Kentucky — my son graduated from high school. We enjoyed a formal dinner and dance, the graduation ceremony and a blow-out of a party with family and friends.

    As I told those gathered to rejoice on Caleb’s behalf, our celebration was not merely backward-looking as we reflect on 12 years of education and investment. It also was forward-looking as we count the blessings of opportunity that await him in the months and years to come.

  • What I heard while tending the vegetable garden

    By now you’ve heard the news: We’re growing, at least physically. The average American male is 17 pounds heavier and the average female 19 pounds heavier than in the late 1970s. And the percentage of overweight children and adolescents in the U.S. has nearly tripled in that same period of time.

    One of the most overlooked and effective ways to fight our growing weight problem is to grow a vegetable garden.

  • Somebody’s gotta pay for the EPA, might as well be you

    If Washington’s environmental zealots have their way, individual Kentuckians will find out via soaring electric bills and unemployment rates: What happens in D.C. absolutely does not stay in D.C.

  • A letter to my son on graduation day

    Dear Dave: We watched as you took your diploma in one hand and shook President Roush’s hand with the other. That was a great moment for all of us, for it signified the closing of one chapter in your life and the opening of another.

    Now that you have your diploma, remember that it has meaning beyond the listing of your name, the date you graduated and the school, Centre College, which granted the degree you earned.

  • Dixie's new stripes moving traffic in E'town

     Subtracting one lane from downtown’s main thoroughfare didn’t seem to add up.

    Transportation engineers said it would work. More than once, studies commissioned to address downtown redevelopment or traffic flow in Elizabethtown promoted the less-is-more idea.

    After a month of experience, the Dixie Diet is working.

    Like any change, it required adjustments. But from personal experience and observation, traffic appears to be moving smoothly and motorists have adapted.

  • Europe’s economic tremors offer useful lesson

    By JIM WATERS

    Americans paying even cursory attention to what’s happening on the other side of the Atlantic are about to get a stark reminder of an economic principle that too often gets pushed to the side – especially during troubling times: No government has ever taxed, spent or borrowed its way to prosperity.

  • Let's apply urgency and effort in support of our pride

    This year’s Memorial Day commemoration comes during a period of questioning — about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the affordability of our government services and which of those services were made in the nation’s best interest.

    I submit that we, as a nation, have no more binding and sacred commitment than to those who wear our uniform and fight in our wars. Their selfless sacrifice on the field of battle has been a distinct hallmark, and saving grace, of this nation since before the Revolutionary War.

  • What's the cost versus value of a child

    By Sylvia Griendling
    Executive Director, CASA of the Heartland

    Take a moment and bring to mind an image of a smiling, happy son, daughter, niece, nephew or grandchild you love, treasure and support emotionally, mentally, spiritually and physically. As you read this column, consider the cost versus the value of your special child.

  • Tourism secretary asks residents to travel Kentucky

    By Marcheta Sparrow

    Kentucky’s tourism industry is gearing up for summer travel season. As someone who has worked in the industry for more than 30 years, I believe we have many good reasons to be optimistic about 2012.

    Recently, during National Travel and Tourism Week, our cabinet announced the tourism industry had an economic impact of almost $11.7 billion in Kentucky during 2011 – an increase from the previous year. Tourism also supported about 170,000 jobs in the state and generated more than $2.6 billion in wages.

  • Senior Life: The struggles of long-distance caregivers

    Imagine these three scenarios.

    The telephone call comes at three in the morning. Your mother, who lives in another state, has fallen, broken her hip, and is in the hospital. She is calling for you to come right away.

    During your once-a-week telephone conversation with your father, you notice a slur in his voice. You’re not expected to visit with him again until the holidays, but something about the conversation makes you change your mind.