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Columns

  • Latest reinvention of your paper: Daily feature pages

    The newspaper is the rarest of all manufacturing systems. Each day the product must be designed and developed from scratch.

    We know we have paper. We know we’ll use ink. Everything else varies from deadline to deadline.

    No two editions are the same. We are in a constant state of inventing and reinventing our product. Modifications, revisions and improvements are part of our everyday life cycle.

  • You never know what words will be your last

    I was standing at the street corner, waiting for the light to change when I saw him out of the corner of my eye. He was waving his left arm from his car window, urgently trying to get my attention. Then, pulling out of his parking space, he stopped in front of me, blocking me from crossing the street.

    Only after he lowered his electric window could I see who it was.

    “I liked your sermon yesterday; I liked it a lot.”

  • One national observance today focuses on family, not tragedy

    Leaving before dawn Thursday, the event involved a 165-mile round trip completed by noon. The activities continued Friday at two separate locations in a city two states away.
    While much of America is occupied and preoccupied by the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, my life revolved around another national observance. Today also is the 32nd anniversary of National Grandparents Day and elementary schools promote the celebration more than any greeting card company.

  • Twenty-three days after 9/11 hard to forget

    by Sharon Thompson

  • HCU consultant explains unification review process

    Hardin County’s citizens have a unique opportunity. Hardin County has the opportunity to unify its existing good local government and become one of the largest and most progressive communities in Kentucky.

    However, before the citizens will be able to consider and vote on whether or not the community should unify, a specific plan first must be developed. Under Kentucky law, this plan only can be developed by what is called the unification review commission.

    Let’s be clear: Only the voters of Hardin County can consider and approve unified government.

  • Today's fictional rewrite of history doesn't erase nature of regret

    Someone, somewhere is reading this today with a desire to rewrite their personal history.

    It's usually influenced by regret: A failure, a lost opportunity, a path not taken.

    Choices have consequences. For each time that we answer opportunity's knock, other doors slam shut.

    Even the wisest moves result in sacrifice. For example, a decision to study law is a worthwhile pursuit, but somewhere today there's a lawyer wondering what life would be like if an interest in architecture had been pursued instead.

  • Local postmaster appeals for Congressional action

    “Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night ... will stay us from the swift completion of our appointed rounds.”

  • USPS is a service, not a business

    For one dollar you can send a birthday card to Uncle Moosejaw in Alaska and an anniversary card to Aunt Aloha in Hawaii and the post office will give you back 12 cents in change.

    Remember now, we’re talking actual greeting cards filled out at your kitchen table then physically moved many thousands of miles by real people for 44 cents a piece.

    How on earth can the United States Postal Service make a profit on this transaction?

  • What's in a name? It's a topic that might not matter

    One thing that advocates, opponents and the indifferent can agree upon: The topic of local government unification has produced plenty of conversation. Most of which start with questions.

    How would it work? Who will benefit? What about the restaurant tax? Will it impact alcohol sales? Will it save money? Will it be more efficient? Who raised this idea in the first place? Do we need a merger? Why? Why not?

  • Hero status of illegal immigrant points to ironies

    “And isn’t it ironic. Don’t you think?” — Alanis Morissette, from the song, “Ironic”

    It’s been a month of bad news: Standard and Poor’s lowered the U.S. sterling credit rating, 30 U.S. service members including 22 Navy SEALs were killed in the single deadliest loss for U.S. troops since the Afghan war began, 3.2 million people in Somalia need food and aid immediately, and the stock market plunges again and again and again

    It’s refreshing to hear a good story: one of heroism, courage and irony.