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Columns

  • Twenty-three days after 9/11 hard to forget

    by Sharon Thompson

  • HCU consultant explains unification review process

    Hardin County’s citizens have a unique opportunity. Hardin County has the opportunity to unify its existing good local government and become one of the largest and most progressive communities in Kentucky.

    However, before the citizens will be able to consider and vote on whether or not the community should unify, a specific plan first must be developed. Under Kentucky law, this plan only can be developed by what is called the unification review commission.

    Let’s be clear: Only the voters of Hardin County can consider and approve unified government.

  • Today's fictional rewrite of history doesn't erase nature of regret

    Someone, somewhere is reading this today with a desire to rewrite their personal history.

    It's usually influenced by regret: A failure, a lost opportunity, a path not taken.

    Choices have consequences. For each time that we answer opportunity's knock, other doors slam shut.

    Even the wisest moves result in sacrifice. For example, a decision to study law is a worthwhile pursuit, but somewhere today there's a lawyer wondering what life would be like if an interest in architecture had been pursued instead.

  • Local postmaster appeals for Congressional action

    “Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night ... will stay us from the swift completion of our appointed rounds.”

  • USPS is a service, not a business

    For one dollar you can send a birthday card to Uncle Moosejaw in Alaska and an anniversary card to Aunt Aloha in Hawaii and the post office will give you back 12 cents in change.

    Remember now, we’re talking actual greeting cards filled out at your kitchen table then physically moved many thousands of miles by real people for 44 cents a piece.

    How on earth can the United States Postal Service make a profit on this transaction?

  • What's in a name? It's a topic that might not matter

    One thing that advocates, opponents and the indifferent can agree upon: The topic of local government unification has produced plenty of conversation. Most of which start with questions.

    How would it work? Who will benefit? What about the restaurant tax? Will it impact alcohol sales? Will it save money? Will it be more efficient? Who raised this idea in the first place? Do we need a merger? Why? Why not?

  • Hero status of illegal immigrant points to ironies

    “And isn’t it ironic. Don’t you think?” — Alanis Morissette, from the song, “Ironic”

    It’s been a month of bad news: Standard and Poor’s lowered the U.S. sterling credit rating, 30 U.S. service members including 22 Navy SEALs were killed in the single deadliest loss for U.S. troops since the Afghan war began, 3.2 million people in Somalia need food and aid immediately, and the stock market plunges again and again and again

    It’s refreshing to hear a good story: one of heroism, courage and irony.

  • Military pensions: Drawing a line in the sand

    By JIMMIE L. FOSTER, guest columnist

    For the past year, I have traveled through every state and several foreign countries meeting with veterans, service members and military families. This experience has given me the opportunity to listen and learn from the heroes of yesterday, today and tomorrow. While meeting our young warriors of today, I saw the same dedication, resolve and honor that was apparent when I served in uniform. It made me happy to be a veteran, national commander of The American Legion and, most importantly, an American.

  • Eight decades of memories pack Howevalley School

    It’s official. The long goodbye has begun for families with deep attachments to Howevalley Elementary School.
    In a way, it will be a goodbye to a way of life. Just as its establishment some eight decades ago closed the era of one-room schoolhouses in that western corner of Hardin County, there’s nothing quite like Howevalley left.

  • Addressing the tragedy of drunken driving

    I have been a prosecutor for the past 14 years, yet I’ve never become accustomed to the sorrow I feel when I’m involved in a case where someone has died because of alcohol-impaired driving.

    These crashes happen far too often: In 2009, alcohol-impaired-driving fatalities accounted for 32 percent of the total motor vehicle traffic fatalities in the United States. That means an average of one alcohol-impaired-driving fatality happened every 48 minutes.