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Columns

  • Don't forget about memorization

    For all the new high school graduates and for any other Kentuckian who wants to play along, here’s a quiz.

    Take a blank map of Kentucky with the county outlines. We’ve provided a copy for you here.

    Now, spend 30 minutes writing the county names in the 120 blank spaces.

    In the meantime, I’ll talk about the lost art of memorization.

    As we emphasize the value of understanding and applying knowledge, sometimes the value of learning by rote has been de-emphasized.

  • Heeding the call of garage sale season

    I was so deep in thought — reading a book about evil and the justice of God, that when my cell phone rang, I flinched. It was my wife, Lori.

    “I thought this weekend would be a great time for a garage sale,” she informed me.

    It wasn’t the news I wanted to hear.

    “Why?” I pleaded, glancing at the book about evil and the justice of God, trying to resist the temptation of associating the first word of the book with garage sales.

  • Rapture: Cashing in on the Apocalypse

    Oops. He missed it again —- the date for the rapture, that is. But that’s OK, miscalculating the date for the end times is nothing new for Harold Camping.

    In 1992, he published his book, “1994?” in which he predicted Sept. 6, 1994 as the beginning of the end. Undeterred by that non-happening, Camping did some re-calculating and published another book in 2008, “We Are Almost There!” He conveniently forgot to mention his 1994 prediction’s failure to launch.

  • Are you up for a challenge?

    By ALICE NICHOLS, guest columnist

    One of the things that I am most grateful for in my life is the privilege of always having had work to do that feels “meaningful.” It is a great blessing to be able to end the day knowing that we have had the opportunity to do something that makes a positive difference in the life of another person or something that contributes to the greater good.  Meaningful work often is difficult, challenging and, at times, frustrating.

  • Time to revisit the beginning

    By AL RIDER, guest columnist

  • Seeing our hometown from one newcomer's perspective

    It's wonderful when someone just opens up, volunteers from their heart and shares fresh insight on familiar subjects.

    It happened for me last week in the most unexpected circumstance.

    Driving along the east end of Ring Road on a misty, overcast Wednesday evening, I spotted a man in the middle of the road. While dressed for the soggy weather, he also navigated this walk in the center turn lane with a black, metal cane.

  • Pornography disrupts real-life intimacy

    Why did the news that the Osama bin Laden’s residence contained a sizable amount of pornography grab our attention?

    After all, our culture is saturated with pornography. It’s everywhere. It's even an accepted part of life for much of society.  

  • New generation introduces new enjoyment

    It was not supposed to happen.

    I was against it. Firmly, against it. I didn’t like it, I didn’t believe in it and I didn’t want to be a part of it.

    But now I’m in. Even before the first day of summer, I already have filled several weekends and a few evenings watching youth soccer.

    It doesn’t sound like a big deal. But an aversion to the soccer culture could be a generational bias. Growing up in Vine Grove about five decades ago, soccer was not on the radar.

  • Motorcycle safety is everyone’s business

    By PAUL CIBOLSKI
    For The News-Enterprise

    Spring has arrived. After a long winter and with the presence of warm and pleasant weather comes the motorcycle riding season.

    The motorcycle population in Kentucky has increased by 311 percent in the past 12 years. In the past year alone, registrations increased by 2,000.

    In 1998 prior to the helmet laws change, there were 36,000 registered bikes. Today that has grown to 112,084.

    In Hardin County, in the past 10 years motorcycle registrations increased from 1,500 to 3,349 in 2010.

  • Saluting those incredible canine heroes

    I could have sworn my dog, Max, quietly napping on my left side, perked up when Diane Sawyer introduced the story about the Navy SEAL dogs on the evening news.

    Max’s brother, Baylor, with eyes half closed, was perched like a cat on the arm of the couch. But when Diane mentioned those heroic dogs, he snapped to attention, instantly turning his head in the direction of the television.

    At least I thought he did.

    My miniature Schnauzers are about as close to being Navy SEAL dogs as I am to being a Navy SEAL. But we three enjoyed the story anyway.