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Columns

  • The puzzlement of parenting our parents

    As I walked away from the emergency room, I felt a heaviness for my friends who had just brought in their elderly father. They were rightly concerned about his health issues.

    But their dad wasn’t. In fact, he was angry that his adult children had insisted on admitting him to the hospital.

    There he rested on the gurney, pouting because he wasn’t home. His lower lip was turned up, childlike, which enhanced the scowl on his face as he weakly waved me away.

    It’s not easy parenting parents.

  • Gifts from my father

    By DEBORAH SMITH
    For The News-Enterprise
    Growing up, I always knew that I was protected and loved. Those special times that he and I shared always will remain in my heart to be cherished.
    And, there are the wonderful gifts that he has given me over the years.

  • Reflecting images from a previous generation

    The door to my grandparents’ house on Red Hill Road never was locked.

    As kids, most visits began with a race from the car to the front porch. The first to arrive would fling open the screen door, turn the knob and bound inside – announcing your presence with a burst of energy.

    My grandmother – Dad’s mom – was there without fail to welcome us.

  • Time for a pith-y idea

    BY L.E. WRIGHT
    For The News-Enterprise

    PITH HELMET n. A light sun hat made from dried pith.

    I will tell you up front, the pith helmet is the answer.

    This past week I celebrated my 71st birthday. Once again, as in the past several summers, I did it by giving my dermatologist another chunk of money for services rendered. You see, once upon a time, I was a young man of steel — I thought. There was nothing on this earth that could hurt me. Nothing would ever hurt me.

  • Armor plans its farewell to Kentucky

    I invite everyone to attend and be a part of a truly historic occasion at Fort Knox on June 10. At 9 a.m. on Brooks Parade Field, the U.S. Army Armor School will perform a colors casing ceremony in which its subordinate units, the 194th Armored Brigade and 316th Cavalry Brigade, will roll up their flags, effectively marking the end of Armor’s chapter at Fort Knox.

  • Tornadoes fall upon the just and the unjust

    Two old codgers decided to make a trip to California. On the way, they stopped at the Grand Canyon. Staring down at the Colorado River 6,000 feet below, gazing at the far side of the canyon 18 miles away, awestruck by the canyon’s multi-colored layers of rock, the two men stood speechless.

    Finally, one said, “Sumpum musta happened here.”

    Yep. It took several million years, but something indeed happened there. And it’s a beautiful display, many would say, of God’s handiwork in nature.

  • Don't forget about memorization

    For all the new high school graduates and for any other Kentuckian who wants to play along, here’s a quiz.

    Take a blank map of Kentucky with the county outlines. We’ve provided a copy for you here.

    Now, spend 30 minutes writing the county names in the 120 blank spaces.

    In the meantime, I’ll talk about the lost art of memorization.

    As we emphasize the value of understanding and applying knowledge, sometimes the value of learning by rote has been de-emphasized.

  • Heeding the call of garage sale season

    I was so deep in thought — reading a book about evil and the justice of God, that when my cell phone rang, I flinched. It was my wife, Lori.

    “I thought this weekend would be a great time for a garage sale,” she informed me.

    It wasn’t the news I wanted to hear.

    “Why?” I pleaded, glancing at the book about evil and the justice of God, trying to resist the temptation of associating the first word of the book with garage sales.

  • Rapture: Cashing in on the Apocalypse

    Oops. He missed it again —- the date for the rapture, that is. But that’s OK, miscalculating the date for the end times is nothing new for Harold Camping.

    In 1992, he published his book, “1994?” in which he predicted Sept. 6, 1994 as the beginning of the end. Undeterred by that non-happening, Camping did some re-calculating and published another book in 2008, “We Are Almost There!” He conveniently forgot to mention his 1994 prediction’s failure to launch.

  • Are you up for a challenge?

    By ALICE NICHOLS, guest columnist

    One of the things that I am most grateful for in my life is the privilege of always having had work to do that feels “meaningful.” It is a great blessing to be able to end the day knowing that we have had the opportunity to do something that makes a positive difference in the life of another person or something that contributes to the greater good.  Meaningful work often is difficult, challenging and, at times, frustrating.