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Columns

  • First impression redirected by a single smile

    I was at one of my favorite restaurants, Jason’s Deli, when I noticed the man sitting at another table, eating with his wife and three young children. He was a big, raw-boned, burly guy, who towered over me when I walked by him, both of us on our way to sit down.

    He plopped onto his chair, perhaps exhausted from work. I slid into the booth with my wife.

    That’s when I took a good look at him. Stern-faced and serious, he cast what seemed like an intimidating aura over his family as they ate together.

  • Hoping to renew the memory of sacrifice

    He’s been gone almost four years: On one hand, not such a long time. But considering he died at age 19, it equates to a big chunk of the life he lived.

    Sammie Phillips died a long way from home. The North Hardin High School graduate was killed in Rustamlyah, Iraq, on Sept. 10, 2007 – 43 months ago today. While in the service of his country as a member of the Kentucky National Guard, Pfc. Phillips’ vehicle overturned on a traffic control mission.

    His family and friends remember his sacrifice.

  • Young life sacrificed in a faraway place

    Working for a daily newspaper serving a military community makes news about our nation’s war effort in foreign lands a familiar thing. It occupies our pages frequently. And on more occasions than any collection of small towns should experience, we’ve published the stories of young men our area has given up on the battlefield.

  • Stuck in frustrating battle with an unseen reality

    Can you believe in something that you have never seen?
    That philosophical question often surfaces in religious circles. Belief in an unseen authority and force is the basis of faith. Preachers often say that evidence of the Almighty is apparent in nature, science and even humanity.
    But this is not a story about religion.

  • It's not insanity: Basketball passion causes madness

    What causes us - normally restrained, responsible people with jobs and families - to lose our minds, whoop and holler, jump up and down, pump our fists in the air and shout “YES!” as we high five each other?

    It’s March Madness, of course, the NCAA Division I basketball tournament which results in the national champion. And if your team didn’t make it, you can find a favorite. For me, it’s usually an underdog - and with the bracket Kentucky had to claw through this year, they surely qualify as one. 

  • Roads may grow but highway numbers remain

    Ky. 313 runs from Interstate 65 across the countryside near Colesburg, crossing U.S. 31W on a rapidly developing corner of Radcliff’s south side before heading toward Vine Grove and coming to an abrupt end near the edge of Hardin County.
    When it was proposed almost three decades ago, the idea was to eventually create an alternative connection from Interstate 64 in southern Indiana to southbound I-65.
    I remember that detail vividly from covering an initial public hearing about the route in the second-floor meeting room of Radcliff City Hall.

  • Census finds concentration of GOP state Senate seats in growing areas

    By Ryan Alessi

    Ten of the 15 Democrats in the state Senate represent districts that are smaller than the target populations for the upcoming round of redistricting.

    And four of the seven least populous state Senate districts are held by Democrats, potentially putting the minority caucus in danger of being redistricted out of more seats.

  • Adjusting the clock is easier than changing our reaction

    Daylight Saving Time: How's that working for you?

    Apparently it’s not so good for many of us. According to a study at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, DST may not be the best thing for our health, since it comes as such a jolt to our cardiovascular systems.

    Have you been dragging out of bed since March 13, the date we moved our clocks forward this year? It’s worth it, isn’t it? After all, we do get that extra hour of daylight.

  • Census will require downsizing of Jimmie Lee's House district

    By RYAN ALESSI

    When lawmakers redraw the state House district lines, they will likely have to extend some of the most urban districts in Louisville and Northern Kentucky to pick up precincts in the growing suburbs.

    Republican lawmakers who represent areas in the outskirts of Jefferson County and its ring counties — as well as in Northern Kentucky — now find themselves with many more people than what a House district should have, according to the new 2010 Census data that came out last week.

  • Census reflects decade of growth

    Numbers are critical to making viable comparisons.

    That’s why businesses produce profit statements and revenue variance reports. It’s why teachers record grades and why they keep score in the NCAA basketball games this week.

    The 2010 Census figures help us track ourselves.