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Columns

  • America's resolve can be seen in twisted steel

    Draped in the stars and stripes, it received a police escort accompanied by dozens of patriots on motorcycles.
    Firefighters erected another huge flag to serve as a welcoming banner.
    Community leaders and everyday folks gathered in humid July conditions to welcome its arrival.
    It is a piece of steel.
    Yet it’s also so much more.
    A fractured part of the World Trade Center’s metal skeleton rests in Radcliff awaiting an opportunity to become the centerpiece of a grand memorial that will serve as a landmark to liberty.

  • My stuff is not junk; it's my stuff

    “You’ll find you’ve brought too much stuff.”

    The words were softly spoken — almost as if to himself — by a retired pastor, a resident of my parents’ retirement community. He seemed to know by observation and personal experience that we take too much stuff with us.

  • Kids tour the world at Towne Mall

    Fun depends on your point of view. It’s the latest lesson from a first-of-summer visit by the grandchildren.
    Funtopia, Blazer’s, local parks and elementary school playgrounds are popular destinations when the kids visit Grandpa and Gigi. You might expect that list.
    But tops among the tourism attractions for the under 4-foot crowd in our family is Towne Mall.

  • Recognizing business potential outside Fort Knox

    On the doorstep of Fort Knox, a massive piece of property sits dormant, waiting for an opportunity to serve the community and capitalize on the needs and wants of military and civil service personnel pouring out of the Wilson Road gate daily.
    At least, that’s what Red Davis thought two generations ago when he developed Redmar Plaza. The Radcliff shopping center, now virtually vacant, still bears the name crafted from his first name and the first syllable of his wife’s, Martha.

  • The puzzlement of parenting our parents

    As I walked away from the emergency room, I felt a heaviness for my friends who had just brought in their elderly father. They were rightly concerned about his health issues.

    But their dad wasn’t. In fact, he was angry that his adult children had insisted on admitting him to the hospital.

    There he rested on the gurney, pouting because he wasn’t home. His lower lip was turned up, childlike, which enhanced the scowl on his face as he weakly waved me away.

    It’s not easy parenting parents.

  • Gifts from my father

    By DEBORAH SMITH
    For The News-Enterprise
    Growing up, I always knew that I was protected and loved. Those special times that he and I shared always will remain in my heart to be cherished.
    And, there are the wonderful gifts that he has given me over the years.

  • Reflecting images from a previous generation

    The door to my grandparents’ house on Red Hill Road never was locked.

    As kids, most visits began with a race from the car to the front porch. The first to arrive would fling open the screen door, turn the knob and bound inside – announcing your presence with a burst of energy.

    My grandmother – Dad’s mom – was there without fail to welcome us.

  • Time for a pith-y idea

    BY L.E. WRIGHT
    For The News-Enterprise

    PITH HELMET n. A light sun hat made from dried pith.

    I will tell you up front, the pith helmet is the answer.

    This past week I celebrated my 71st birthday. Once again, as in the past several summers, I did it by giving my dermatologist another chunk of money for services rendered. You see, once upon a time, I was a young man of steel — I thought. There was nothing on this earth that could hurt me. Nothing would ever hurt me.

  • Armor plans its farewell to Kentucky

    I invite everyone to attend and be a part of a truly historic occasion at Fort Knox on June 10. At 9 a.m. on Brooks Parade Field, the U.S. Army Armor School will perform a colors casing ceremony in which its subordinate units, the 194th Armored Brigade and 316th Cavalry Brigade, will roll up their flags, effectively marking the end of Armor’s chapter at Fort Knox.

  • Tornadoes fall upon the just and the unjust

    Two old codgers decided to make a trip to California. On the way, they stopped at the Grand Canyon. Staring down at the Colorado River 6,000 feet below, gazing at the far side of the canyon 18 miles away, awestruck by the canyon’s multi-colored layers of rock, the two men stood speechless.

    Finally, one said, “Sumpum musta happened here.”

    Yep. It took several million years, but something indeed happened there. And it’s a beautiful display, many would say, of God’s handiwork in nature.