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Editorials

  • Two-minute tribute honors farmers

    ISSUE: Memorable message
    OUR VIEW: Remember that values have roots

    Americans admire the farmer. You might even call it love.

    Fighting the elements to produce the world’s richest yield only to be paid pennies compared to the retail dollar value of his goods, the American farmer is part scientist, part conservationist, part businessman and all laborer.

    While the image is admired, it’s also often taken for granted.

  • Praiseworthy ideas, efforts

    ISSUE: People making a difference
    OUR VIEW: It begins with an idea

    When you see a need, act upon it.

    That’s the life lesson from Rachel Ritchie, 9, who thinks the playground equipment at Optimist Park in her hometown of Vine Grove should be accessible to all.

    Rachel recently carried her message to a meeting of Vine Grove City Council.

    “I have an idea to get playground equipment for the disabled kids in Vine Grove,” the third-grader said.

  • Glen Dale offers opportunity

    TOPIC: The former Glen Dale Children's Home
    OUR VIEW: Opportunity exists at the property

    It once was something quite special at 2125 Gilead Church Road.

    Youngsters saw their lives changed and saved by one-time strangers. Under roofs, young people were receiving much needed structure and guidance. They learned a work ethic and a love and respect for the person next to them, and in front of them.

  • Black History Month worth celebrating

    ISSUE: Celebrating the stories of a people
    OUR VIEW: Black history enlightens us all

    Some people wonder why Black History Month is necessary. They ask if it is fair to separate one race for special observance. Black America’s history is, after all, American history, too.

    Critics say such observances focus too much attention on the most notable figures while glossing over the countless black Americans who have struggled, toiled and defended their lives and homes in relative obscurity.

  • Gary Canter shaped LaRue, area wrestling

    TOPIC: Coach's retirement
    OUR VIEW: A Hawk forever

  • Fair fun goes back half a century

    ISSUE: 50 years of the Hardin County Fair
    OUR VIEW:
    Thanks for a half century of summer fun

    Although the traditional gift and color typically associated with a 50 th anniversary celebration is gold, a more fitting color might be blue - as in county fair blue ribbon blue. At least it should this year be for the Hardin County Fair.

  • Giving takes many forms

    ISSUE: Gifts of service, effort and land
    OUR VIEW: Thanks for vital contributions

    When recognizing the service of an elected official, the evaluation must go beyond their attendance at public meetings where decisions are made.

    True public servants put in many more hours attending countless gatherings, talking with voters, researching issues and observing. Dianne Cooper, who recently closed out her tenure on the Elizabethtown School Board, seemingly was always on the job.

  • Giving students more

    ISSUE: Early college and career center
    OUR VIEW: Synergy brings students competitive opportunity

    The marketplace has no borders. Continuous innovations make products and services better and more efficient. Burgeoning competition in business means communities, workers and even trainees need an edge to succeed.

  • Going red for women

    ISSUE: National Wear Red Day
    OUR VIEW: Take action through attire

    Still in your bathrobe? Go put on something red.

    Already dressed in another color? Go back to your closet and change.

    Red. It’s a great color. It conjures excitement and an image of grace. It’s a power color that’s been known to boost self-confidence. It pops, drawing eyes. It signifies love and warmth.

  • Making the field more level

    ISSUE: Women in combat
    OUR VIEW: Keeping up with reality

    The Pentagon last week recognized that American society has changed and it is time for the military to follow suit by opening combat jobs for women.

    “They’re fighting and they’re dying together,” Leon Panetta said during a Jan. 24 news conference in which he announced women no longer would be barred from most military combat jobs. “The time has come for our policies to recognize that reality.”