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Editorials

  • Single ceremony marks three changes on post

    ISSUE: Changes in command and mission at Fort Knox
    OUR VIEW: More changes will come 

    Fort Knox continues to change in its long and important role played for our nation’s military. During a recent multi-purpose ceremony, the post saw one decade-long mission draw to a close as its colors were cased, the retirement of the post’s commanding officer and the transfer of authority to new commander.

  • Legislative boundaries devolve into legal fight

    ISSUE: Legislative lawsuit
    OUR VIEW: Court action is unsettling

    Barring a last-minute change in tactics, the dispute over legislative redistricting will move Monday from the Capitol’s corridors to a Franklin County courtroom.

  • Laurels for good news

    TOPIC: Good deeds abound
    OUR VIEW: County offers opportunitiesto applaud

    Students at T.K. Stone Middle School soon will have the opportunity to learn about engineering.

    The school district approved the Project Lead the Way program following a presentation by a representative of the University of Kentucky. The program is a series of engineering classes for middle or high school students. The program also is in place at Central Hardin and North Hardin high schools and J.T. Alton Middle School.

  • House Bill 30 would commercialize education

    ISSUE: Advertising on school buses
    OUR VIEW: Careful thought must be given

    In it’s infinite wisdom, the Kentucky House of Representatives passed House Bill 30 last week, which allows for commercial advertising on school buses.

    While the measure awaits action in the Senate, let’s consider a few words of concern.

    Just the thought of taking one of our last social icons, the yellow school bus, and turning it into a rolling billboard seems wrong.

  • Chilling reminder about fire safety

    ISSUE: Prepardness at home
    OUR VIEW: Smoke detectors save lives

    When Houston “Butch” Beswick and Carol Crain went to sleep late Sunday night or early Monday, Jan. 16, it’s a good bet they didn’t think it would last forever.

    Early that morning, neighbors sounded the alarm that Beswick’s home was on fire. When firefighters arrived, the home was “fully involved.” All the highly trained volunteers could do was keep the flames from spreading to other properties.

  • Outlining skills needed by events coordinator

    ISSUE: Elizabethtown to hire events coordinator
    OUR VIEW: Qualified candidate must be a 'numbers' person.

    The city of Elizabethtown and Elizabethtown Tourism and Convention Bureau are working out details on a new partnership intended to fill a void left by the Hardin County Chamber of Commerce in running the Heartland Festival, Cruisin’ the Heartland and other events.

  • Early release from prison may be a necessary evil

    As Gov. Steve Beshear announced his budget plans last week, he described significant cuts which he acknowledged would reach into services that most Kentuckians consider vital.

    It appears we got a head start on the bad news Jan. 3, when the state released nearly 1,000 prisoners into various communities. While changes in the penal code last year led to the release, the Get Out of Jail Free cards will translate into savings of an estimated $40 million.

  • Redistricting process does not make a pretty picture

    ISSUE: Legislative redistricting
    OUR VIEW: Independent draft needed

    Having seen the process up close, first-term state Sen. Dennis Parrett, D-Elizabethtown, does not think legislators should be in charge of redrawing boundaries for House and Senate seats.

    He wants to see an independent process designed to best apportion the 100 House members and 38 senators among Kentucky’s population.

  • Much ado about waste

    ISSUE: Trash showdown possible
    OUR VIEW: Looking for compromise

    In considering an ordinance that strengthens language about the destination of trash and refuge created in Hardin County, Fiscal Court is protecting the financial integrity of the Pearl Hollow Landfill.

    It’s a business decision in essence.

  • Thurman’s death affects a community

    TOPIC: Death of Amber Thurman
    OUR VIEW: Her impact is long lasting

    The death of beloved Abraham Lincoln Elementary School Principal Amber Thurman sent shockwaves throughout the LaRue County school district.

    Her stunning death in an early morning car crash leaves a void in this tight-knit educational community where it is common for teachers at the various schools to know each other.