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Editorials

  • Elizabethtown Sports Park begins to book events

    Recent news that the under construction Elizabethtown Sports Park is beginning to get a flow of traffic on its tournament calendar is refreshing.
    After all, one of the reasons to build the much-debated, $28 million multi-sports complex was to bring in out-of-town teams and generate additional revenue within the county for restaurants, hotels and businesses.

  • Redistricting does not have to be political toy

    Establishing legislative districts may seem as simple as drawing lines on a map. But like most tasks, the devil is in the detail.
    To establish fair and equal representation, the districts all must contain a reasonably similar number of residents. Every person is represented: Man, woman, child or infant — not just voters. The goal is set based on census results.
    So in addition to drawing lines, there’s math involved. The General Assembly has a breakdown of every voting precinct within every county to help balance the totals.

  • Former foster children facing difficult futures

    In the foster care system, it’s called “aging out.” It involves foster kids between 18 and 21 years of age who are no longer eligible for the care provided through the system. For those who exit foster care this way, the statistics stacked against their odds of success as independent young adults aren’t good.

  • Role models paved the way

    Hardin County has suffered some recent losses in the deaths of women who have greatly contributed to who we are as a community.
    Glorina Bishop, the “First Lady” of First Baptist Church in Elizabethtown and Charley Nell Llewellyn, a former social worker and advocate, both died this month.
    Their contributions to the lives of many over decades will not soon be forgotten.
    Bishop, who was 79, was the wife of the Rev. B.T. Bishop and someone who broadened her impact with her commitment to various organizations.

  • Too many to count

    ISSUE: Thanksgiving Day
    OUR VIEW: This great nation is blessed

    It’s here again, Thanksgiving Day. A date on the calendar of our lives on which we are to individually and collectively reflect upon and give thanks for all that is meaningful to us. A day set aside to recognize the blessings we too often overlook and take for granted the other 364 days of the year.

    It seems again this year, though, there’s more an attitude of discontent than thankfulness among many in the nation.

  • Remembering Honest Abe and the local Memorial

    ISSUE: Lincoln Memorial centennial
    OUR VIEW: Recalling the past with thanks

    The 100th anniversary of the Lincoln Memorial in LaRue County serves as a reminder of a precious part of our heritage.

    Too often in the hussle of life, the past gets pushed aside. No history is more precious to America than Abraham Lincoln and no story resonates with the entire world quite like his.

  • Welcome home requires more than ceremonies

    ISSUE: Soldiers returning from combat
    OUR VIEW: Time and understanding needed

    Fort Knox and the community at large celebrated with soldiers’ families Thursday as an advance team of 57 returned from deployment in Afghanistan.

    The return of the 3rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division is a long-awaited event. Over the next several weeks, more than 3,400 soldiers will return with the task to be complete by January.

  • Pine Valley's future is not a city matter

    ISSUE: Pine Valley foreclosure
    OUR VIEWNot a city government issue

  • Holiday bargain hunting brings out the crowds

    ISSUE: Black Friday shopping
    OUR VIEW: You’d better have a plan

    Annually, shoppers have lined up outside stores, putting their backs to a predawn November chill, waiting for the unofficial start of the Christmas shopping season.

  • Making note of some good going on

    TOPIC: Good effort and good deeds
    OUR VIEW: Many rewarded for hard work

    When Central Hardin High School ventured to Indianapolis last week to compete in the nationally renowned Bands of America competition, the marching Bruins left with high hopes.

    The band also left Lucas Oil Stadium, home of the NFL’s Indianapolis Colts, as one of the premier bands in the competition. Bands competed from as far away as Oklahoma, Louisiana and Texas, and Central Hardin managed to advance into the semifinals of the competition.