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Editorials

  • BRAC comes to quiet end

    ISSUE: Completion of Fort Knox’s transition
    OUR VIEW
    : We’re at the top, but at a precipice

    You may not have noticed it, but September has been a historic month for Hardin County.

    The Elizabethtown Metropolitan Statistical Area — which includes all of Hardin and LaRue Counties — was first on a list of 366 such areas for percentage growth in gross domestic product, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.

  • Praise ranges from 9-11 events to 89-year-old's walk

    TOPIC: Kudos abound
    OUR VIEW: Good things going on

    Ten years ago, our country was hurting from the terrorist attacks in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Shanksville, Pa.
    The loss of 3,000 lives and our national sense of security have been long-lasting hurts.
    In Hardin County, we used more than words to show that we will never forget. There were countless events remembering the lost lives of emergency service personnel and innocent residents of the United States.

  • It's time for HCU to focus on other vision goals

    ISSUE: HCU's unification push
    OUR VIEW: Move on to other goals

    Developing a product and selling it are very different processes.

    After 14 months of research and development by its governance subcommittee, Hardin County United offered the community its best logic in drafting a recommendation to consider government unification.

  • Delabar's baseball path is a big league story

    TOPIC: Stevie Delabar
    OUR VIEW: Perseverance pays off

    The Stevie Delabar story is not just a good sports story; it’s a good story on life and how you always pursue your dreams no matter how high the hurdles you have to climb.

    The former Central Hardin High School pitcher is in the major leagues with the Seattle Mariners, less than six months after being out of baseball and serving as an assistant baseball coach at John Hardin High School.

  • Army changes Purple Heart policy

    ISSUE: Purple Heart eligibility
    OUR VIEW: Head injuries should qualify

    The Army’s decision to make more concussion victims eligible for the Purple Heart says more about medical science than military policy.

    As researchers and doctors gain a better understanding of head injuries, the information is changing everything from treatment regimens to high school sports.

  • Shopping local helps entire community

    ISSUE: Shop Local
    OUR VIEW: It just makes sense

    As a consumer, you have many choices as to how and where you spend your hard-earned money. It is that freedom to make those choices that is a part of our American heritage that young men and women defend every day.

  • Heartland Interfaith breaks down barriers

    ISSUE: Heartland Interfaith seminar

    OUR VIEW: Well-timed, important topic

     

    The absence of knowledge many times is a prevalent source of fear. If the veil of the unknown is lifted and realities illuminated, it can make a difference.

  • Heartland Festival deserves devotion needed to succeed

    Bardstown has its Kentucky Bourbon Festival and Paducah has its National Quilt Show. Pikeville has its Hillbilly Days and Owensboro has its International Bar-B-Q Festival. London has its World Chicken Festival and Elizabethtown has its … well, we’re not sure what we’ll have.

    Unfortunately, there is a looming question mark of uncertainty surrounding the future of the Heartland Festival. That’s a shame.

  • HCS wise to pass on food program

    Hardin County Schools has decided to say no to the Community Eligibility Option, part of President Obama’s Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. The federal government program set into motion in December 2010 would have provided a free lunch to all students at qualifying schools in the district.

  • Recycling trailers become focus of community tensions

    ISSUE: Recycling trailer for Radcliff
    OUR VIEW: Confront root issue, not symptom

    Recycling trailers established by Hardin County government provide an option for residents interested in being green.

    After more than four years of quietly serving as drop points for cardboard, newspapers, aluminum cans and some types of plastic bottles, the trailers have become a point of political debate.