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Editorials

  • Rep. Jimmie Lee's honors are rooted in dedication

    ISSUE: Award for Jimmie Lee
    OUR VIEW: Legislator seeks to serve

     

  • Advice for parking problem: Give offenders the boot

    ISSUE: Unpaid parking tickets
    OUR VIEW: Deal with violators

    The city of Elizabethtown “may” start towing vehicles that have outstanding parking violations. They “may” start enforcing the city parking ordinance but then again they “might” implement a grace period or amnesty to give violators a chance to clean up ticket problems before vehicles are towed.

  • Clearing a path to political tradition

    ISSUE: Brushy Fork Debates
    OUR VIEW: Year three will be critical

    Nothing and no one can create a tradition. It requires repetition and time.

    Vine Grove’s effort to play a significant role in Kentucky’s political scene is laudable. But the crowds attracted for the Brushy Fork Debates could be politely described as lacking.

    After two years, Brushy Fork is trying to find its niche.

  • Don't fear lofty goals

    ISSUE: United Way goal
    OUR VIEW: Reach for challenge

    We are a society that invests heavily in goals.

    We want our children to achieve only A’s and B’s in school and use many motivational tools to get the job done. We want to retire by a certain age or have a certain number of children or to vacation at least once a year on a sun-drenched beach.

    We like goals.

  • Family Resource Centers and other accolades

    TOPIC: Good news abounds
    OUR VIEW: It's what we do around here

    Unless you have utilized or assisted a school Family Resource and Youth Services Center, you have no idea of the value these centers bring to hundreds of Hardin County students and their families every day.

    But for 20 years, the centers have helped elementary school children and their families in various ways such as child care, and middle school and high school students and their families with finding work and ways to battle substance abuse.

  • Wet or dry? It's a matter of economics and choice

    Now that the momentum of Fort Knox’s realignment is coming to an end, it’s time for Hardin County collectively, and residents of Vine Grove, Radcliff and Elizabethtown independently, to ask: “What’s next? How do we maintain, if not accelerate our momentum?”

    Unfortunately, there is no panacea, no “next big thing” like BRAC on the horizon. But there are steps that can be taken to continue to best-position the community for economic growth. Approving local option alcohol sales can be one such potential economic development step.

  • Habitat's Mega Build upgrades community

    ISSUE: Habitat for Humanity's Mega Build 
    OUR VIEW: Project improves quality of life 

    Col. Samuel Haycraft is credited in Elizabethtown history as being one of three early settlers in the area. Along with Capt. Thomas Helm and Col. Andrew Hynes, Haycraft is recorded to have built three blockhouse stockades in 1779 as protective shelter and defense against the Native Americans that weren’t particularly happy to share the local wilderness with these newcomers.

  • Desires and dreams could use some money

    Charitable foundations can and do perform philanthropic acts that benefit the community as a whole. Lately, we've been hearing about the potential of foundations to spur community development in areas ranging from education to economics.

    The North Central Education Foundation, best known because it fueled the establishment of what has become Elizabethtown Community and Technical College, has been involved in everything from high-minded research to providing property for bricks and mortar projects such as the Hardin County Public Library's main branch.

  • One Knox's efforts, results are not a point of debate

    ISSUE: The value of One Knox
    OUR VIEW: Impact is clear, unquestionable

    To deal with the regional impact of Fort Knox’s transformation, several local communities joined hands to form a focused message of welcome and support.

  • It's no secret that finding consensus can be controversial

    If you promise not to repeat it, I’ll let you in on a little secret.

    I probably shouldn’t mention it. It’s really kind of embarrassing, considering what I do for a living. I trust that you’re not going to hold it against me.

    Remember, you promised not to tell anyone.

    Here goes. My big secret: I’ve never been a fan of newspaper opinion pages.