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Letters

  • Nov. 27, 2011: Our readers write

    Farmer’s perspective
    This is a reply to a Nov. 20 letter titled “On Antibiotic Use.”As a cow/calf farmer on a family farm that sends cattle to  confined animal feeding operations, I also am concerned about antibiotics being administered to my calves. I can assure that in all the feedlots that have fed my calves, antibiotics are only used to treat sick calves.

  • Nov. 24, 2011: Our readers write

    Why smoke-free matters
    If someone had told me 20 years ago, when I first began my public health career, that one day 34 percent of Kentuckians would live in a smoke-free community, I would not have believed it. Today, it is true.

  • Nov. 23, 2011: Our readers write

    Fourth-class concerns
    With the approval of the alcohol ordinance, the fourth- class city honey-truck backed up and dumped another load of crap onto the laps of Elizabethtown residents. All alcoholic beverages sold in the city will carry an additional 5 percent tax that can only be levied by fourth-class cities.
    There is some logic behind the statute. True fourth class cities, being small, might not have an expansive police force. The tax would allow them to hire additional officers.

  • Nov. 22, 2011: Our readers write

    Biblical reflections
    The political controversy that followed the recent Hindu ground blessing ceremony in Hardin County has quieted. However, this event revealed a deeper, spiritual issue that lingers on — that many seem to lack understanding of Biblical truth. I write in a loving spirit merely to attempt to show what the Bible says regarding these issues.

  • Nov. 21, 2011: Our readers write

    Difference of view
    I never cease to be amazed at how effectively our mainstream media can spin facts in favor of those candidates they support or how easily they fool most people. For the good doctor who recently wrote in this paper, I wish you had been there Nov. 1 when State Sen. David Williams addressed the Central Kentucky Tea Party.

  • Nov. 20, 2011: Our readers write

    On antibiotic use
    Antibiotic resistant infections are considered a serious threat to public health by the Center for Disease Control — in 2002 alone, it is estimated that more than 99,000 people died as the result of a hospital-acquired infectious disease. In 1998, the Institute of Medicine estimated antibiotic resistance generated at least $4-$5 billion per year in extra costs to the U.S. health care system.

  • Nov. 18, 2011: Our readers write

    Care for animals during winter
    Winter, with its bitter wind, rain and snow, is rapidly approaching. Now is the time to check our dog houses and patch and repair all cracks and leaks. It is time for new, clean bedding. Straw is the best and this bedding needs to be replaced often and putting a board along the bottom of the door opening helps keep the bedding inside the house. Also, turning the door away from the wind helps protect your dog from the cold.

  • Nov. 17, 2011: Our readers write

    Nov. 17 is World Prematurity Day
    This year, for the first time, a World Prematurity Day will be observed on Thursday, Nov. 17 by the March of Dimes, along with organizations in Africa, Europe and Australia.

  • Nov. 11, 2011: Our readers write

    A Veteran’s Day thank you
    On Veterans Day, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the many citizens of Hardin County who made contributions to the Elizabethtown Disabled American Veterans Chapter 003 “Forget Me Not” fundraiser. Members of DAV Chapter 003 set up donation stations at the Fort Knox Commissary, Radcliff and Elizabethtown Wal-Mart stores, and the Dolphin Drive Kroger store in Elizabethtown. Please know that your donations will go to help local area veterans and their dependents.

  • Nov. 9, 2011: Our readers write

    Where’s the fence?
    You have heard the old Wendy’s commercial, “Where’s the beef?” Well, I am wondering, “Where’s the fence?”
    My neighborhood has been enveloped by the Elizabethtown Sports Park. Therefore, I assumed the park would be providing a privacy fence for the homes which lie adjacent to the ball fields. I was shocked and appalled this week to see they had planted tall, skinny shrubs as their idea of privacy and security (not to mention a noise barrier) between my back yard and the park.