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Today's Opinions

  • Riverport offers savings, opportuniites

    ISSUE: Meade County’s new riverport
    OUR VIEW:
    Opening up markets for the region

    Following what was at first a rocky start with its development partner and a decade-long construction period, the Meade County Riverport Authority is scheduled to open its new regional grain port facility sometime before the harvest season this fall.

  • Auction discovery possesses rare value

    On a cold Friday night before spring arrived, my sister attended an indoor auction — more for entertainment than acquisition.

    Attending auctions can be fun. A good auctioneer puts on a great show from the melodic chant of the sale to the comedic banter between offerings.

  • April 20, 2014: Our readers write

    Thanks for focusing on faith experiences
    This subscriber was happy to see Suzanne Darland’s article about Easter’s Holy Week on the Wednesday’s Woman page. I still remember my Catholic upbringing and experience as an altar boy during Holy Week and other significant days celebrated in our church.

  • Merge goals, not bankrolls

    ISSUE: Promotion of Elizabethtown Sports Park director
    OUR VIEW: While unifying parks, keep accounting separate

  • Vital investment made for state’s foster children

    During the 2014 session of the Kentucky General Assembly, the Children’s Alliance urged Kentucky lawmakers to take action and make the thousands of foster children who have been placed in the state’s custody a budget priority.

    We at Home of the Innocents are celebrating the fact that those who represent us in Frankfort have responded.

  • General optimism

    ISSUE: Predictions about Fort Knox’s future
    OUR VIEW: Post commander offers optimism

    With a community reliant on Fort Knox as one of its economic engines, business leaders are pleased to welcome Brig. Gen. Peggy Combs’ optimistic outlook.

  • Government provides underpinning for innovation

    Five years ago, the federal government spent $169 billion to fund basic research and development. This fiscal year, it’s down to $134 billion.

    People who believe in public belt-tightening applaud declines like that. I understand why: There are many reasons to reduce government spending.

    ut in this case they’re wrong. We need to boost the government’s investment in R&D, not slash it.

    Let’s begin with the federal government’s record, which is nothing short of impressive.

  • Renewing the argument for a statewide smoke-free law

    By Shawn Jones

    What will it take to reverse generations of damage from chronic exposure to secondhand smoke? For many years, Kentucky has had the dubious distinction of leading the nation in early death and disease from breathing in toxic tobacco smoke both voluntarily and involuntarily.

    I see the tragic results of our collective inaction in my practice as a physician every day. As a society we must act to address this issue, and we must do so for three reasons.