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Today's Opinions

  • Acts of service to praise, cherish

    The New Year has arrived but some praiseworthy mentions are due related to some December accomplishments.

    A patriarch of education. The Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence, which has been the leading voice for improved education in Kentucky for a quarter century, received a like-minded figure when Al Rider decided to accept its invitation to serve on the committee.

    The recently retired president and CEO of the Central Kentucky Community Foundation has been a long-time advocate of improving public education.

  • Jan. 13, 2014: Our readers write

    Harry Berry set higher standard

    The announcement of Judge-Executive Harry Berry to seek a fourth term as leader of Hardin County probably came as good news to many. His list of accomplishments is long in the time he has spent in office. But there is one subtle achievement that most won’t realize. It’s his leadership from the top down. 

  • Jan. 12, 2014: Our readers write

    Seeking to restore education funding

    As the 2014 General Assembly begins, I want to raise citizens’ awareness of a critical issue facing our legislators: new school funds to match the higher expectations for our students and our educators. 

  • High school student shares his outlook on American liberty

    By Vince Whelan, a student at North Hardin High School

     

    With the end of the Revolutionary War, we Americans consecrated this land as our own, where freedom thrives for the sake of all men.

    During the American Civil War, we challenged the interpretation of this freedom, and sought to make it a more perfect definition.

  • High school student shares his outlook on American liberty

    By Vince Whelan, a student at North Hardin High School

     

    With the end of the Revolutionary War, we Americans consecrated this land as our own, where freedom thrives for the sake of all men.

    During the American Civil War, we challenged the interpretation of this freedom, and sought to make it a more perfect definition.

  • Give credit where it is due

    ISSUE: Academic credit for military training
    OUR VIEW: Give credit where credit is due

  • Trust, but definitely verify

    Of all the numbers thrown at us over the course of last year, one stands out for me. I hope we can avoid repeating it this year.

    That number is 12. It’s the percentage of Americans in a December Quinnipiac poll who said they trust the government in Washington to do what is right most or all of the time.

    It’s a depressingly small number — especially compared to the 41 percent who say they “hardly ever” trust the government. This meshes with recent polls that echo a bleak truth: Trust in government is at historically low levels.

  • Jan. 10, 2014: Our readers write

    Concerned by story about soldier’s fate

    I can’t believe what I read about that soldier dying due to not having first aid personnel at a physical training site in a story in Tuesday’s paper. I served in the U.S. Army for 28 years, I cannot remember ever going to any training site that we did not have medics there in case there was an emergency.