Today's Opinions

  • When your child’s name is on a tombstone

    By Tammy Nischan

    Leaning against the doorframe of the school workroom, she shared her struggle.

    She had snapped at her daughter all morning, because she was stressed.

    “I can’t keep living like this,” she sighed.

    As I looked into her aching eyes, I saw myself. I saw a woman trying to balance a career with motherhood. I saw a woman who longs to be the best she can be at work while longing to be the best she can be at home.

  • Nov. 17, 2013: Our readers write

    Immigration laws still being ignored

    Normally, laws passed by Congress or any other legal legislative body are required to be enforced by law enforcement authorities. Failure to do so by police authorities constitutes at a minimum malfeasance or worse. Laws are to be enforced unless overturned by the legislature which enacted them or declared unconstitutional by a proper court.

  • Nov. 15, 2013: Our readers write

    Volunteers are  Hosparus backbone

    In the mid-1970s, a group of thoughtful citizens came together joined by a common interest. They believed people deserved to live the best quality of life possible until the end of life. That meant having a choice in how and where they would spend those remaining months, weeks or days.

    These selfless volunteers brought a new kind of care to our communities called “hospice.” They weren’t sure if it would work or if it would last – they did it anyway.

  • Reviewing the review panel

    ISSUE: Child fatality group requests state funding
    OUR VIEW: Money only part of needs to succeed

    It has been no easy first year for the Child Fatality and Near Fatality Review Panel. Tasked through a 2012 executive order by Gov. Steve Beshear, this 17-member panel is charged with making system improvement recommendations based on the review of case files of children killed or who nearly died as a result of abuse or neglect while in the state’s child protection system.

  • Nov. 13, 2013: Our readers write

    It is interesting that The News-Enterprise has certain guidelines for publishing letters written to the editor.

    There have been letters, articles and phrases made by many — especially people like Harry Reid, Nancy Pelosi and others — condemning Tea Party Patriots. We have been called Nazis, anarchists, racists and various other derogatory names unfit to print.

  • Project United's extreme impact

    TOPIC: United Way's building makeover
    Work of many benefits many

    It really doesn’t matter that nobody is outside of the building and screaming, “Move that bus.”

    The United Way of Central Kentucky’s Project United makeover is just as significant, and likely more, than what was accomplished for a number of years on the television series Extreme Makeover: Home Edition.

  • Riding to the Capitol with a bus full of nuns

    I first planted a garden because of something an Italian monk wrote some 1,500 years ago.

    His name is Benedict — St. Benedict of Nursia. And the document he penned became known as his rule or guide for monastic life.

    As author Jon Sweeney has noted, the Rule of St. Benedict became not only the basic guide for generations of monks in various religious orders, but it established a “way of life rooted in the Gospel and grounded in the scriptural principles of charity, stability and faithfulness.”

  • Nov. 12, 2013: Our readers write

    Honoring veterans

    Once again for the fifth year, our group is collecting funds to place a wreath on every headstone at the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery-Central in Radcliff.

    The cemetery opened in 2007 and is averaging 500 burials a year. We are a part of the Wreaths Across America, a nationwide endeavor to recognize our veterans during the holidays.  Their motto is “Remember, Honor, Teach.”