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Today's Opinions

  • Facing life with Bible and newspaper in hand

    Pick it up and read it. No, I don’t mean the Bible, although I read it every day.

    But for now, I’m referring to the newspaper.

    Despite rumors of its demise, the newspaper is surviving and in some instances, thriving.

    I know that’s reading the paper is the exception and not the norm. According to a 2010 Harris Poll, 1 in 10 American adults say they never read a daily newspaper and only 2 of 5 read a daily newspaper, either online or in print.

  • Decision leaves would-be swimmers high and dry

    ISSUE: Local Red Cross ending swim lessons
    OUR VIEW: Void must be filled

     After 50 years of treading water, dog paddling, flutters and dolphin kicks, the Hardin-LaRue Service Center of the American Red Cross last month announced it is ending its local swimming-lessons program.

    The decision came from its parent organization, the American Red Cross, which is undergoing restructuring and wants outside providers to handle the program, said Brett Daugherty, administrative assistant at the local office.

  • June 18, 2012: Our readers write

    Veterans organizations’ help requested

    On Feb. 15 of this year, I wrote a letter to the editor concerning the Veterans Tribute and the impact it would have on this community and the tourist trade that would be generated as a result of its close proximity to Interstate 65.

  • For safety's sake, fight like this girl

    TOPIC: Reaction of abducted girl
    OUR VIEW: Action credited with saving her life
     

    In a matter of minutes, the life of a 10-year-old girl from LaRue County changed forever.

    From being asleep on a Saturday night in a house, police said, she found herself in the hands of a male adult intent on sexual assault in a heavily wooded area behind the residence.

    Police said the child was abducted and raped by 28-year-old Jetto Dye, who faces criminal charges. A parent’s worst nightmare was lived out.

  • New road creates new perspectives

    Standing on the fresh pavement of the Ky. 313 extension awaiting a dedication ceremony Wednesday, the new road directed my mind to a distant past.

    As the summer sun beat down, the smell of hot asphalt became obvious. That's the odor of opportunity and it triggered memories.

    Just about a mile from the dedication site is the plot of ground where I grew up. On many similar summer days a lifetime ago, the same scent of blacktop filled the air.

  • Producing 'standardized' workers

    By PETER WEDDLE

    Since former President George W. Bush amped up standardized testing throughout the nation in 2002 with the No Child Left Behind Act, critics say results have been negative.

    The bottom line is that there is no clear correlation between standardized testing and the knowledge and skills kids will need to prosper in the 21st century world of work. It seems we’re more interested in creating a homogenized workforce than a nation of individuals who have learned what their talent is and how to bring it to work with them.

  • Standouts in every way

    ISSUE: Hardin Countians make an impact
    OUR VIEW: At home and away, kudos noted

    Mary Jo Veirs deals with death and dying on a daily basis. As a nurse in Kosair Children’s Hospital’s intensive care unit, she sees more than most could stand.

    She tries to put that aspect of the job aside and focus on the care her patients and their families need. For her efforts, the hospital named her Nurse of the Year.

  • Changing HMH records promises many benefits

    ISSUE: HMH's ER goes paperless
    OUR VIEW: Complying with federal mandates 

    When a medical emergency requires a trip to the emergency room, a patient’s attention and desire understandably becomes narrowly focused.

    The ailing individual wants the injury or illness attended to with urgency, expertise and care. They want to move quickly from the waiting room, through triage and into the main treatment area where doctor and nurse attention can fully focus on their needs.