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Today's Opinions

  • Acknowledging a woman who recognizes others

    ISSUE: Donna Betson and Wreaths Across America
    OUR VIEW: Well-deserved recognition of volunteer and leader

    Morrill Worcester’s name may not be familiar to many Hardin Countians, but Donna Betson’s should be. Although they likely never met one another in person, there is an important connection these two incredibly giving people have with one another. And the beneficiaries of their connection are the soldiers and families their collective work memorializes through the Wreaths Across America organization.

  • Front-door escape met with unacceptable reaction

    Minimum security incarceration in Hardin County now comes with a free pass to the community. With minimum attention and minimum supervision, two inmates recently receive opportunities to roam freely throughout our communities.
    The reaction from jail leadership: “Unfortunately, there’s nothing to change.”

  • All I want for Christmas is my nip and tuck

    Back in 1944, while teaching music in public school, Donald Gardner asked his second-grade class what they wanted for Christmas. Noticing how almost all his students answered him with a lisp because they had at least one front tooth missing, Gardner sat down and wrote the song, “All I Want for Christmas is My Two Front Teeth.”

    Unfortunately, at least for many youth, it takes much more than two new front teeth to fit into the norm physically; it takes a nip here and a tuck there.

  • Getting reacquainted with Grandpa on his 100th birthday

    Dec. 10, 1911, a century ago, my grandfather was born.

    A powerful figure in my childhood, the image of my grandfather remains fully formed more than two decades after his death.

    He awoke before dawn daily to milk cows and tend to farm chores before putting in a day’s work at Fort Knox. He had big features that probably seemed bigger because of his bald head. A strong man with huge, powerful hands and a forceful personality to match, he enjoyed a rowdy argument about as much as he enjoyed a good laugh.

  • Dec. 11, 2011: Our readers write

    A tree farmer’s perspective
    I am a tree farmer in Hart County. Along with Kentucky’s other 467,000 family forest owners, I am proud that my woodland property provides my community with clean air, clean water, wildlife habitat, recreational opportunities and forest products. Most people think the federal government or big industry owns most of Kentucky’s 12 million acres of forests but, in fact, most of Kentucky’s forests are owned primarily by family farmers.

  • Front-loading education can address many ills

    ISSUE: Early childhood education
    OUR VIEW: Apply solutions on front end

    Young children have a high capacity for learning. Confronted with new discoveries daily, their minds act like sponges of information.

    But sometimes kids absorb the antics of SpongeBob SquarePants instead of educational building blocks such as reading and math. It's time to refocus.

    Get Ready!

  • Maintaining focus will advance fight against AIDS

    ISSUE: World AIDS Day
    OUR VIEW: Awareness helps beat the threat

    Since the AIDS epidemic began 30 years ago, advances have been made in the medical and awareness arenas, but the disease has an astounding global impact and often a stigma.

    In the United States, about 1.2 million people are living with HIV, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One in five of those don’t know they are infected. About 16,000 people with AIDS die each year.

    Last week, communities observed World AIDS Day.

  • Dec. 9, 2011: Our readers write

    Progress can hurt
    Cecilia has been my home for many years. I see changes every day around me. New industrial parks are close by. Many new homes are being built and many already are built throughout the county. This has increased our population greatly.
    With population growth, a need for new schools arises. This brings up another matter of possibly losing some of our farm land to build schools. This may be sad but necessary for progress in education. As a community grows, we must suffer some inconvenience and be willing to accept it for the good of our children.