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Features

  • Jay DuPlessis, who will be a senior at Elizabethtown High School, wears many hats in his life. Soccer, Eagle Scouts, history and faith all come together to complete DuPlessis.

    He’s done it all without letting a stutter in his speech get in the way.

    The upcoming seasons will be his third as manager of the EHS girls soccer team and fourth year managing  basketball.

    “I love being around the players,” he said.

  • The smell of fresh rain lingered in the air as Judge Kelly Mark Easton stood beneath the cover of a tree June 10 on Fort Hill. He watched as a University of Kentucky researcher pushed a four-wheeled radar device across the thick grass of the cemetery at Fort Duffield.

    “It’s not very exciting to watch,” said Philip Mink, an archaeologist and anthropologist with UK. “It’s like mowing the grass.”

  • The shop on the corner of Hawkins Drive and Valley Creek Road has attracted a variety of visitors during its 46 years of operation, and Elmer Hicks is one big reason.

    As owner of Hicks Repair Service, Hicks, 88, has received visits from customers looking for lawn mower parts, friends looking for conversation over cups of strong coffee and even a rooster with a fondness for cherry tomatoes.

  • Suggested natural materials for wreaths:

    Eastern red cedar

    Inkberry holly

    American holly

    Ornamental grasses

    Pine cones

    Euonymus

    Virginia pine

    Needled evergreens

    Plants that will keep their leaves when cut

    Ask first before cutting greenery from another's property.

    Christmas tree farms can be a source of cuttings.

    Source: Amy Aldenderfer, right, Hardin County Cooperative Extension agent for horticulture.

  • Facts and safety tips from the National Fire Protection Association Public Education Division

    Heating

    Tips

  • Compiled by ROBERT VILLANUEVA

    The News-Enterprise

    For many children the holiday season conjures images of Santa at his North Pole workshop supervising his elves in their toy-making activities, preparing to fulfill wishes expressed in letters from all over the world.

  • Sandra Cilyok of Elizabethtown looked at a yellow gourd in her hand and saw a penguin.

    “He just looked like a penguin when I looked at him,” she said.

    Cilyok once held a fuzzy newborn penguin at an aquarium and is a fan of the animated movie “Happy Feet,” which is about the animals.

  • A lifetime of work in politics and government began for Radcliff resident Les Dawson when he was growing up in West Point.

    Dawson, 83, recalls being as young as 7 when his grandmother — who he described as a “strong Democrat” — would take him along with her on local government visits.

    “She knew everybody in the courthouse,” he said of his weekly trips there.

  • After many years of public and community service, Carolyn Ritchie is ready for a break.

    Those who work with her say it’s deserved.

    Ritchie retires from her position as county treasurer July 31, her 64th birthday. She started working for Hardin County government in 1996 and became treasurer in 2000.

    As treasurer, she oversees grants, payroll, investments, bills and revenue for the county.

  • Beginnings are the sweetest. An innocence permeates the beginnings of friendships, professions and professions of love, an innocence that takes the heart to a different place. I have stayed in that place often enough and long enough to know its magic.

    We live better; we love better; we think better; we are better in the beginning.

    Some beginnings are firsts and other times, we begin again. But all beginnings require courage, because they are filled with risk.