• If you go: "Another HCP Halloween," a fundraising production presented by Hardin County Playhouse, is at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Plum Alley Theater in the Historic State Theater complex in Elizabethtown. Tickets are $20. For more information, call (270) 352-0577.

    What would it have been like if Judge Judy had presided over the Salem Witch Trials? Or what if serial killer Aileen Wuornos and suspected axe murderer Lizzie Borden were among the all-female hosts of a talk show?

  • Approach Steve Mueller’s Elizabethtown home, and you might hear motion-activated sinister voices addressing you as skeleton figures, hanging bats and a knife-wielding clown greet you.

    Add to the mix giant spiders, a skulking vampire, creepy creatures, a wicked witch, scattered bones, a ghoulish graveyard and a variety of eerie items, and Mueller’s property goes beyond typical decorations.

    “Each year I put more and more,” Mueller said.

  • Mitzi Yvonne Lynch had a link to music and the performing arts from the time she was born.

    “I was named after Mitzi Gaynor,” Lynch said, explaining her father was a fan of the noted dancer of stage and screen.

    Her middle name is a nod to actress Yvonne DeCarlo.

    Lynch’s father played trombone and saxophone.

    “They both could sing,” she said of her parents.

    So it might not come as a surprise that Lynch became the music minister of Immanuel Baptist Church in Elizabethtown.

  • Among the inspirations for the subject matter for Elizabethtown artist Sherry Pearl are her childhood and a children’s story.

    But Pearl did not arrive at her style of whimsical art through any particular course of study.

    In fact, she got there despite her studies in art.

    “I got so hung up on the rules, so one day I said, ‘Forget the rules,’” Pearl said.

    Using bright acrylic paints, the artist creates scenes focused primarily on people.

  • Elizabethtown residents Rudy and Pat McKinney often find themselves smack dab in the 1700s.

    The couple makes 18th century-style furniture and crafts and participates in historic re-enactments.

    “It’s the time period where our country was beginning,” Pat said, explaining what drew her to the 1700s.

  • As a business owner, mom and philanthropist, Kelly Emerine stays pretty busy and busy is how she likes it.

    “I’m happy when I’m busy,” she said.

    The 32-year-old grew up in Elizabethtown and graduated from Elizabethtown High School. She went to the University of Kentucky and earned a degree in English education. When she was a child, she was constantly changing what she wanted to do when she grew up. The president, a teacher, a professor — it was all on the list.

  • For the past four years, Dr. Shannon Holt has worked side by side with her father, Dr. Lucian Moreman, at Elizabethtown Physicians for Women.

    While her mom, Phyllis, was a bit leery, thinking the working situation would be stressful, she now sees that it has been a wonderful experience for both of them.

  • Bruce and Yoshiko Fonda of Radcliff will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary June 1, 2011.

    They were married June 1, 1961, in Okinawa.

    Mr. Fonda is a retired Sgt. Maj. from the U.S. Army and retired from service as a loan officer at Fort Knox Federal Credit Union.

    Mrs. Fonda is very active in a bowling league and Soka Gakai International.

    They have two children, 13 grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

  • Many times students only associate their teachers with their school or classroom, but teachers have lives too. Some of them have interesting jobs or fun hobbies outside the classroom.

    Sylvia Stuckey teaches special education and digital photography at James T. Alton Middle School. She loves teaching but it can sometimes be demanding and stressful and she looks forward to her weekends.

  • When Older Americans Month was established in May 1963, only 17 million living Americans had reached their 65th birthdays. At that time, about a third of older Americans lived in poverty and there were only a few programs to meet their needs. However, national interest in senior citizens and their needs began to circulate through the efforts and wisdom of President John F. Kennedy.

  • The day begins early, the same as it does every day. The alarm clock reminds that it was only a few hours ago since sleep was interrupted again.
    Time for a quick cup of coffee before the daily routine of caring for an older family member begins. The routine of toileting, showering, dressing, laundry, meal preparation, giving medications and housekeeping chores has to be completed before a doctor’s appointment later that morning.

  • A visit to a green roof atop a Louisville building and a contest held by a floor covering company allowed Elizabethtown resident Nathan Bush an opportunity to do what he loves — create and design.

    Bush, who graduated from the University of Louisville with a degree in interior architecture, entered Mannington Commercial’s tx:style Design Challenge 2011 with a carpet design called “Squiggle.”

    “I always had an interest in art and design,” Bush said.

  • Displaying quotes and photos of such strong and successful women as Edith Wharton, Ruth Gordon and Oprah Winfrey, a bulletin board in the Elizabethtown Community and Technical College science building is representative of the achievements aspired to by the students who created it.

    The bulletin board was created by the ECTC organization “we.”

  • On Mondays after school, students from Woodland Elementary School can be found making a lot of noise without getting into trouble.

    Members of The Woodland Drums, a group of auditioned students led by music teacher Aaron Dale, are putting sticks and hands to a variety of drums, gaining a deeper understanding of music, performance and teamwork.

  • Its members are preparing to celebrate 10 years, but the genesis of The Elizabethtown Area Sacred Community Choir technically goes back more than a decade to 1999, when the Israel-Palestinian conflict grabbed the attention of Sida Roberts.

    About that time, Roberts read about a cantata written for healing of the nations and knew it needed to be part of a local service. She began contacting the music directors at various churches in the community to form a collaborative effort, leading to the creation of the choir's board of directors in 2001.

  • Kyu Reisch may stand just under five feet tall, but the long list of ways she’s served her community makes her one of the tallest women in town.

    She's logged more than 17,000 hours of volunteer service with the American Red Cross, donated another 5,000 volunteer hours to Army Community Service, provided her bilingual skills as a volunteer translator and has somehow found time along the way to run a restaurant and stand out athletically.

  • Some classes at area high schools seem more like the TV shows “CSI,” “Law & Order” or “Project Runway” than readin’, writin’ or ‘rithmatic.

    Take the Forensics class taught by Deborah Whelan at North Hardin High School, for example.

  • A special group of women have been lending their hands to help the community, leaving behind a purple wake of good deeds.

    Purple is the signature color of Women With A Purpose, a group whose mission statement describes them as "a group of dynamic Christian women" whose puprose is to be a positive influence. The group seeks to provide cultural acitvities and civic and social entertainment to the Hardin County community.

  • To find out more about Videobred Inc., a Louisville-based company owned by Hardin County resident Jamie Pence, visit www.videobred.com.


  • Wendy Wilburn seems to do Everything 4 Kids.

    The business owner has two stores — named Everything 4 Kids, of course — in Radcliff and Elizabethtown. But the disabled veteran is more than a business owner. Wilburn helps moms, children and families by providing donations and resources.

    The origin of her business venture began in 2001 when she and her husband, Chris, were both active duty military. Wilburn began selling her son’s “gently used” items at a flea market in Elizabethtown.